SKY17-002

Final report for SKY17-002

Project Type: PDP State Program
Funds awarded in 2017: $11,111.00
Projected End Date: 06/30/2020
Grant Recipient: Kentucky State University
Region: Southern
State: Kentucky
State Coordinators:
Dr. Marion Simon
Kentucky State University
Co-Coordinators:
Dr. Paul Vincelli
University of Kentucky
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Project Information

Abstract:

Kentucky’s Model State Program is focusing on needs identified from our state SARE advisory council.
Recent investments in agent training have focused on sustainable communities, food processing, family finances and organic production. Kentucky State University continues to make the Third Thursday Program the focus of its SARE MSP funding.

This year KSU will be hosting the Third Thursday Thing’s 20th Anniversary Celebration which will provide ample demonstrations and lectures on a variety of sustainable agriculture topics.
Third Thursdays have become an institution in Kentucky professional development educational programming. The broad range of topics (listed in a later section) ensure that agricultural professionals and producer leaders have training in the skills necessary on a diversified small farm. TTT also serves as a space for synergies in small farm education. Many conferences and educational meetings are planned around “Third Thursdays” including:
o the Annual Small, Limited-Resource/Minority Farmers Conference,
o the SRRMEC Regional Training on risk management, farm economics, livestock farm management, and crop and
  vegetable farm management (multiple programs).
o The OAK-Organic Association of Kentucky- Updates

Project Objectives:

2017 Objectives & Outcomes:
– Build a broad base of interest and skills in agricultural sustainability among extension agents and other
professionals in the state
– Equip them with the needed skills & resources to assist farmers, marketers, and community leaders, and to
facilitate a diverse range of collaborative projects.
– Build effective partnerships with NRCS, FSA, and the Kentucky Department of Agriculture
– Evaluate and revise our broad strategic plan, and to develop KYSARE LOGIC Model for the program as a whole.

We have delivered on these goals through several projects including: Third Thursday Things’ wide variety of
topics, the Annual Minority and Limited Resources Farmer Conference, GAP Third Party Audit training for extension agents, small-scale fruit and vegetable disease identification and integrated management agent trainings, producer leaders, and NRCS personnel. We supported the 2017 Kentucky Grazing Conference, including printing publications on Pasture-finishing beef to be distributed to agents, as well as the producers they serve. Our directors and program assistant have put an emphasis on networking and promoting the program to agencies across the state.
Additional goals for 2017 include:
– Increasing support of professional development for NGO service providers.
– Further development of relationships with those delivering livestock and grain programming.
– Sustained education in Genetic Engineering and its pros and cons for sustainability.

Advisors

Click linked name(s) to expand
  • Ken Andries (Educator and Researcher)
  • Andre Barbour
  • Mac Stone
  • Edwin Chavous (Educator)
  • Mark Ferguson (Educator)
  • Jeff Henderson (Educator)
  • Curt Judy (Educator)
  • Dana Lear
  • Lee Meyer (Educator and Researcher)
  • Janet Mullins (Educator and Researcher)
  • Gary Palmer (Educator)
  • Louie Rivers, Jr. (Educator)
  • Susan Schlosnagle
  • Tehran Jewell (Educator)
  • Ed Thompson
  • Paul Vincelli (Educator and Researcher)
  • Brett Wolff (Educator)
  • Martin Richards (Educator)

Education

Educational approach:

Kentucky State University continues to make the Third Thursday Program the focus of its SARE MSP funding. As Dr. Jordan affirmed at our 20th Anniversary Celebration last July, Third Thursdays have become an institution in Kentucky professional development educational programming. The broad range of topics (listed below) ensure that agricultural professionals and producer leaders have training in the skills necessary on a diversified small farm. TTT also serves as a space for synergies in small farm education including educator-to-educator, farmer-to-farmer, and farmer-to-educator interactions

Education & Outreach Initiatives

Food Safety and Grapes (Third Thursday Workshop--August)
Objective:

To expose trainees to concepts in Food Safety and Grape production.

Description:
Outcomes and impacts:
Attendees (numbers indicated below) learned about Food Safety principles and Grape production. 
 
Total Attendance:        37
Hispanic:            0
Non-Hispanic:     37
Veterans:           4
Males:               20
Females:            17
Under 18:          1
African-American:  4
Caucasian:         26
Asian/Pacific Islander:  7
American Indian/Alaskan Native:  0
Other:               0
Aquaculture (Third Thursday Workshop--September)
Objective:

To expose trainees to production and marketing practices in Aquaculture.

Description:
Outcomes and impacts:

Attendees (numbers indicated below) learned about production and marketing practices in Aquaculture.

Total attendance:  76
Males:  43
Females:  33
Veterans:  13
Under 18:  8
Hispanic:  3
Non-Hispanic:  72
Caucasian:  56
African-American:  12
Asian/Pacific Islander:  2
American Indian/Alaskan Native:  2
Other:  3
Goats (Third Thursday Workshop--October)
Objective:

To expose trainees to up-to-date information regarding production and marketing of goats and goat products.

Description:
Outcomes and impacts:

Attendees (numbers indicated below) learned about production and marketing of goats and goat products.

Date:  October 19, 2017
Total attendance:  69
Male:  38
Female:  31
Hispanic:  0
NonHispanic:  69
Under 18:  7
Veterans:  10
Caucasian:  54
African-American:  6
Asian/Pacific Islander: 1
American Indian/Alaskan:  1
Other:  2
AgrAbility & Small, Limited Resource, & Minority Farmer conference (Third Thursday Workshop--November)
Objective:

To expose trainees to a wide variety of production, marketing, quality of life, and other topics relevant to small and limited resource farmers.

Outcomes and impacts:

150 Attendees learned about a wide variety of topics through the conference, as well as specific topics related to Agrability’s efforts in making agriculture accessible to all.

 

Grapes (Third Thursday Workshop--January)
Objective:

To expose trainees to additional production and marketing considerations as they relate to grapes.

Description:
Outcomes and impacts:

Attendees (numbers indicated below) learned about production and marketing of Grapes.

Total attendance:  45
Veterans:  8
Non-Hispanic:  44
Hispanic:  1
Male:  27
Female:  18
Under 18:  4
Caucasian:  28
African-American:  10
Asian:  0
American Indian:  0
Other:  3
Organics and Industrial Hemp (Third Thursday Workshop--February)
Objective:

To expose trainees to topics in Organic-specific production and introduce major considerations regarding Industrial Hemp production on small Kentucky farms.

Description:
Outcomes and impacts:

Attendees (numbers indicated below) learned about Organics and Industrial Hemp.

 

Total attendance:  99
Male:  51
Female:  48
Hispanic:  3
Non-Hispanic:  96
Under 18:  14
Caucasian:  72
African-American:  12
Asian/Pacific Islander:  2
American Indian/Alaskan Native:  3
Other:  5
Goats & Sheep (Third Thursday Workshop--March)
Objective:

To respond to continued interest in goats and sheep and expose trainees to additional topics in production and marketing of goat and sheep products.

Description:
Outcomes and impacts:

Attendees (numbers indicated below) learned about additional considerations for goat and sheep production and marketing.

Total attendance:  97
Veterans:  14
Hispanic:  0
NonHispanic:  97
Male:  49
Female:  48
u/18:  12
Caucasian: 
African-American:  11
Asian/Pacific Islander:  0
American Indian:  2
Other:  2
 
USDA Programs and Resources (Third Thursday Workshop--April)
Objective:

To expose trainees to the various programs and resources available through the United States Department of Agriculture.

Description:
Outcomes and impacts:

Attendees (numbers indicated below) learned about USDA programs and resources.

Total attendance:  62
Females:  33
Males:  29
Veterans:  6
Hispanic:  0
Non-Hispanic:  65
Under 18:  8
Caucasian:  40
African-American:  18
Asian:  0
American Indian:  1
Other:  1
 
Kentucky State University is expanding its Third Thursday Program by adding a Fourth Wednesday Small Sustainable Beef Cattle Production Program at the Bluegrass Stockyards and Marketplace (at their request).  The first meeting was held on May 23, 2018 at 6:30 p.m. with 45 registered participants.  Participants registering included 22 African Americans, 22 Caucasians, 1 Hispanic, 19 women, 2 youth, and 9 veterans.  Professionals included County/Area Agents, KSU State Specialists and staff, NRCS employees, and Conservation District professionals.  The distance traveled by participants covered the most northern to the southern Kentucky counties.

Educational & Outreach Activities

9 Workshop field days

Participation Summary

150 Extension
25 NRCS
60 Researchers
55 Nonprofit
60 Agency
285 Farmers/ranchers

Learning Outcomes

635 Participants gained or increased knowledge, skills and/or attitudes about sustainable agriculture topics, practices, strategies, approaches
300 Ag professionals intend to use knowledge, attitudes, skills and/or awareness learned

Project Outcomes

300 Agricultural service provider participants who used knowledge and skills learned through this project (or incorporated project materials) in their educational activities, services, information products and/or tools for farmers
285 Farmers reached through participant's programs
Additional Outcomes:

Many conferences and educational meetings continue to be planned around “Third Thursdays” including:

    • the Annual Small, Limited-Resource/Minority Farmers Conference
    • the International Pawpaw Conference
    • the Regional SARE Goat Project’s Collaborator Conference
    • the SRRMEC Regional Conference on the “Risk-Assessed Business Planning for Small Producers”curriculum, and many others. 

SSARE MSP funding allows KSU to carry on its tradition of serving minority and limited resource producers through its extension system. Training extension personnel, NRCS, other ag service providers, and producer leaders helps to amplify the message of SARE to this group.

Face of SARE

Face of SARE:

Kentucky’s SARE PDP program objective is to build a broad base of interest and skills in agricultural sustainability among extension agents and other professionals in the state, equip them with the needed skills to assist farmers, marketers, and community leaders, and to facilitate a diverse range of collaborative projects. The way that we manage our programs has led to strong partnerships with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, NRCS, FSA, Community Farm Alliance, Kentucky Center for Agricultural and Rural Development, the Cooperative Extension Service, Grow Appalachia, as well as grower groups across the state.

The program assistant is often the face of the KYSARE program, since half of his job is to support and implement the Model State Plan. He is actively involved in Kentucky State University’s “Third Thursday Thing” monthly sustainable ag field days and in the wide range of program activities.The core job of KY SARE’s Program Assistant is coordinating all of the SARE-promoted trainings. 

Because sustainable agriculture programs in Kentucky extend much beyond the SARE-supported programs, the program assistant actively participates in other activities. This includes attending extension and grower events where he simultaneously represents KYSAREHis engagement with these programs assists in expanding the visibility of the SARE Program.  The current Program Assistant has strong networking and leadership skills that help us build productive partnerships with FSA, KDA, and NRCS

635 Farmers received information about SARE grant programs and information resources
300 Ag professionals received information about SARE grant programs and information resources
Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture or SARE.