“The Third Tuesday-Thursday Thing”: Building on Kentucky’s Experiences and Expanding the Sustainable Agriculture Educational Model into Tennessee

2001 Annual Report for ES01-052

Project Type: Professional Development Program
Funds awarded in 2001: $50,000.00
Projected End Date: 12/31/2004
Region: Southern
State: Kentucky
Principal Investigator:
Dr. Marion Simon
Kentucky State University

“The Third Tuesday-Thursday Thing”: Building on Kentucky’s Experiences and Expanding the Sustainable Agriculture Educational Model into Tennessee

Summary

The “Third Tuesday” Thing has now successfully started at tennessee State University with monthly workshops ranging in size from 8 participants to 85 participants. Staff at Tennessee State University are excited for the potential impact of this program on their state.

Kentucky State University’s “Third Thursday” Thing has grown to average 85 participants with 15 being African Americans. Throughout the year, some 1,200 participants participate in programs with 250 of them being professionals from 1890 and 1862 Land Grant Universities, state and private colleges, high school vocational education teachers, USDA, state government employees, the state legislature, and others. Many sustainable agriculture activities have started across Kentucky as a result of this effort. KSU had 550 participants in its Biennial Small Farm Field Day which included a Farm Safety Training by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture.

Objectives/Performance Targets

1. To educate 1862 and 1890 research and Extension professionals and paraprofessionals about sustainable agriculture with a particular emphasis on small farms. Behavior change: An increased awareness and acceptance of the practicality of sustainable agriculture which is reflected through their recommendations.
2. To educate 1862 and 1890 research and Extension professionals and paraprofessionals about practical uses of organic agriculture with a particular emphasis on small farms. Behavior change: An increased awareness of the practicality of organic agriculture for selected enterprises. An acceptance of organic and alternative production techniques and a willingness to make recommendations to producers.
3. To educate 1862 and 1890 research and Extension professionals and paraprofessionals about alternative marketing systems and new farm enterprises with a particular emphasis on small farms. Behavior change: An increased acceptance of alternatives to tobacco and alternative marketing systems within the land grand field staff. Recommendations to farmers reflect these changes.
4. To educate farmer leaders, USDA, and agricultural professionals including state government departments about sustainable agriculture and organic agriculture with a particular emphasis on small farms. Behavior change: An increased awareness and acceptance of the practicality of sustainable agriculture and organic agriculture which is reflected in their recommendations and activities. An increased emphasis on programs that targetsmall farms and diverse farmer clientele.
5. To foster shared learning experiences between agricultural professionals and farmers. Behavior changes: Researchers, Extension staff, and agricultural professionals strengthen their farmer support base. Researchers develop a direct link to the farming community for developing problem-solving, applied research projects to meet the needs identified by the farmers. A strengthened inter-agency, interdisciplinary, inter-organization support base which can be drawn upon by agricultural professionals and paraprofessionals, particularly field staff. Strengthened professional interactions and ties between Kentucky and Tennessee which includes the fostering of joint activities.

Accomplishments/Milestones

The “Third Tuesday” Thing has now successfully started at tennessee State University with monthly workshops ranging in size from 8 participants to 85 participants. Staff at Tennessee State University are excited for the potential impact of this program on their state.

Kentucky State University’s “Third Thursday” Thing has grown to average 85 participants with 15 being African Americans. Throughout the year, some 1,200 participants participate in programs with 250 of them being professionals from 1890 and 1862 Land Grant Universities, state and private colleges, high school vocational education teachers, USDA, state government employees, the state legislature, and others. Many sustainable agriculture activities have started across Kentucky as a result of this effort. KSU had 550 participants in its Biennial Small Farm Field Day which included a Farm Safety Training by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture.

Impacts and Contributions/Outcomes

The “Third Thursday” and “Third Tuesday” sustainable agriculture workshops focused on marketing issues including certified kitchens, value-added, and local sales; goat production and marketing; farmer to consumer – the need for producing healthy food; pawpaw production and marketing; farm equipment and safety; sustainable fish and shrimp production for small farmers; livestock production systems; agr-ability, forestry and its value-added products, and sustainable and organic vegetable production. Kentucky’s workshops averaged
85 participants with some workshops numbering over 225 and the Biennial Small Farm Field Day having over 550 participants. Tennessee’s workshops grew from 8 to 85 participants with participants from two states. “Third Thursday” was selected as one of the top 12
SARE projects nationwide. Kentucky had the largest delegation to the 2002 Southern SAWG (Sustainable Agriculture Working Group) Annual Meetings – 76 participants.

Collaborators:

Richard Winston

TN State U.
TN 37209