Grass-roots Empowerment in Kentucky’s Local Conservation Districts: Leadership Training on Sustainable Land and Water Quality Management Practices

Project Overview

ES97-028
Project Type: Professional Development Program
Funds awarded in 1997: $86,280.00
Projected End Date: 12/31/2000
Matching Federal Funds: $26,690.00
Matching Non-Federal Funds: $25,090.00
Region: Southern
State: Kentucky
Principal Investigator:
Stephen Coleman
Kentucky Division of Conservation

Annual Reports

Commodities

  • Agronomic: barley, corn, millet, oats, rye, soybeans, wheat, grass (misc. perennial), hay
  • Fruits: apples, peaches, berries (strawberries)
  • Vegetables: cucurbits, peppers, sweet corn, tomatoes
  • Additional Plants: trees
  • Animals: bees, bovine, poultry, goats, sheep, swine, fish
  • Animal Products: dairy

Practices

  • Animal Production: pasture fertility, pasture renovation, grazing - rotational, feed/forage
  • Crop Production: conservation tillage
  • Education and Training: extension, farmer to farmer, focus group, mentoring, networking
  • Farm Business Management: whole farm planning
  • Natural Resources/Environment: grass waterways, riparian buffers, riverbank protection, soil stabilization, wetlands
  • Pest Management: chemical control, field monitoring/scouting, integrated pest management
  • Soil Management: organic matter, soil quality/health
  • Sustainable Communities: partnerships, public participation, sustainability measures

    Abstract:

    This project was conducted to help develop agriculture/conservation leadership at the county/district level, to create a framework of leaders that understand the public significance of the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Act, and the impact of the development of water quality plans for each farm on Kentucky’s sustainability. This project equipped leaders with tools for assisting landowners in preparing and implementing agriculture water quality plans.

    This project provided training and guidelines for professional agency representatives, Conservation District Supervisors, and County Extension Agriculture Advancement Council members. This cooperative leadership approach is required to accomplish the objective of reaching the estimated 90,000 plus landowners affected by the Act.

    This project was successful in creating a significant body of local and regional leaders with an enhanced knowledge of water quality issues and regulations having the ability to help promote and conduct agriculture water quality training in their local communities.

    Project objectives:

    This SARE project was conducted to help develop agriculture/conservation leadership at the county/district level, to create a framework of leaders that understand the public significance of the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Act, and the impact of the development of water quality plans for each farm on Kentucky’s sustainability. This project will equip leaders with tools for assisting landowners in preparing and implementing agriculture water quality plans. The goal is to prevent the pollution of the waters of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

    Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture or SARE.