Residual doramectin in alpaca manure compost

Project Overview

FNE17-867
Project Type: Farmer
Funds awarded in 2017: $14,521.00
Projected End Date: 12/31/2018
Grant Recipient: Faraway Farm Alpacas
Region: Northeast
State: New York
Project Leader:
Dr. Steve Cole
Faraway Farm Alpacas

Commodities

  • Animals: camelids
  • Animal Products: fiber, fur, leather
  • Miscellaneous: Compost, garden fertilizer, soil amendment

Practices

  • Animal Production: animal protection and health, grazing management, manure management, parasite control, preventive practices, rangeland/pasture management
  • Crop Production: fertilizers, food product quality/safety, organic fertilizers
  • Education and Training: demonstration, farmer to farmer, networking, on-farm/ranch research, participatory research, technical assistance, workshop, youth education
  • Farm Business Management: apprentice/intern training, feasibility study, whole farm planning
  • Natural Resources/Environment: Environmental risks due to veterinary medicines
  • Pest Management: compost extracts, integrated pest management, physical control, prevention, soil solarization
  • Production Systems: organic agriculture
  • Soil Management: composting, green manures, organic matter, soil analysis, soil chemistry, soil microbiology, soil quality/health, toxic status mitigation
  • Sustainable Communities: sustainability measures

    Proposal summary:

    Most alpacas and llamas in eastern U.S. are treated with ivermectin or doramectin via subcutaneous
    injection as part of a monthly regimen to prevent meningeal worm. Meningeal worm is hosted by
    white-tailed deer, and snails and slugs are intermediate hosts. When alpacas or llamas ingest the
    infective larvae, migration to the central nervous can cause muscle weakness, paralysis and death.
    No commercial vaccine is available therefore prevention is based on management principles and
    monthly deworming.

    Veterinary studies have demonstrated that ivermectin can persist in manure and soil for months and
    that ivermectin can be excreted in manure in concentrations highly toxic to organisms in the
    ecosystem. Thus, the fate of these medications in alpaca manure is of deep concern since they may
    pose environmental and health risks. No well-controlled studies have investigated the decay rate of
    subcutaneously administered doramectin in alpaca raw manure or in alpaca manure compost.
    Faraway Farm Alpacas is home to 20 alpacas. We treat the alpacas monthly with injectable
    doramectin subcutaneously. Using the manure from our alpacas, we propose a well-controlled study
    to: 1) determine maximum concentration of doramectin in alpaca manure after subcutaneous
    injection; 2) determine doramectin concentrations in turned and unturned piles of composted alpaca
    manure over 6 months.

    Results from this project will be submitted for publication to alpaca trade magazines and to a
    relevant peer-reviewed scientific journal. Besides presentations at alpaca shows and at our farm
    workshops, results will be presented at Westchester County’s Agriculture and Farmland Protection
    Board’s annual educational forum.

    Project objectives from proposal:

    Faraway Farm Alpacas is home to 20 alpacas. We treat the alpacas monthly with doramectin 1.0%
    (10 mg/ml) injectable. Using the manure from our alpacas, we propose a well-controlled study to: 1)
    determine maximum concentration of doramectin in alpaca manure after subcutaneous injection –
    these concentrations are determined from raw manure samples taken daily for 7 days and at 14 days
    after injection; 2) determine doramectin concentrations in turned and unturned piles of composted
    alpaca manure over the course of 6 months – samples are taken periodically from the composting
    piles; 3) compare temperature, and physical and chemical characteristics of composted alpaca
    manure between turned and unturned piles. The study will provide data to determine decay rates of
    doramectin in unturned and turned compost piles. It is expected that composting manure from
    alpacas that have been dewormed with doramectin decreases the concentration of doramectin in the
    resulting compost product and that the rate of decay will be greater for the optimally composted
    pile.

    Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture or SARE.