Analyzing Baby Ginger as a Profitable Crop Through Organic Certification and Value-Added Processing

Project Overview

FS16-289
Project Type: Farmer/Rancher
Funds awarded in 2016: $9,978.00
Projected End Date: 03/14/2018
Grant Recipient: Farmer
Region: Southern
State: Virginia
Principal Investigator:

PROJECT NOT COMPLETED. PROJECT CLOSED OUT 11/15/18 DUE TO NONCOMPLIANCE OF USDA TERMS AND CONDITIONS IN THE AWARD AGREEMENT.

Commodities

Not commodity specific

Practices

No practices identified

Proposal summary:

Lowland growers in the Piedmont region of Virginia experience success in growing high tunnel ginger. Yet even they resist growing large amounts as the shelf life for baby ginger is short — perhaps two weeks from harvest. To date, no available research has been performed on the actual probability of growing baby ginger in Zone 6 of the Appalachian Mountains.

Small plantings of ginger have succeeded in high tunnels here so we know it can be done. The unknown return on investment for larger plantings, storage concerns around baby ginger and the general mystery remaining around the culture all pose obstacles to those interested in ginger as part of their sustainable growing strategy.

How can organically grown baby ginger be produced and marketed for project under high tunnels at elevation in the southern Appalachian Mountains?

Can baby ginger be processed into a profitable value-added product?

Project objectives from proposal:

How can organically grown baby ginger be produced and marketed for project under high tunnels at elevation in the southern Appalachian Mountains?

Can baby ginger be processed into a profitable value-added product?

Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture or SARE.