Sustainable Management of Soil-borne Diseases in Nursery Production

Project Overview

GS16-155
Project Type: Graduate Student
Funds awarded in 2016: $11,000.00
Projected End Date: 08/31/2018
Grant Recipient: Tennessee State University
Region: Southern
State: Tennessee
Graduate Student:
Major Professor:
Dr. Fulya Baysal-Gurel
Tennessee State University

Information Products

Commodities

  • Additional Plants: ornamentals, trees

Practices

  • Crop Production: cover crops, nurseries
  • Pest Management: biofumigation, cultural control, integrated pest management
  • Soil Management: green manures, soil microbiology

    Abstract:

    Soilborne diseases are the most serious production problem of Southern region nursery producers and these producers have cited better, more effective alternative soilborne disease management as their highest priority need. The goal of the proposed research is to improve soilborne disease management and nursery production efficiency through effective applications of biofumigant cover crops in nursery production. The use of biofumigant cover crops has been explored most extensively in vegetable, fruit and flower production. To date, their use and value have not been documented in woody ornamental nursery production. Specific questions to be addressed in this research include: 1) What are the effects of using biofumigant cover crops (oilseed radish, mustard (white, Mighty Mustard® Pacific Gold, oriental, red giant and Amara) turnips (purple top forage), arugula (Sylvetta Green, Wasabi, Bellezia, Dragon’s Tongue, Olive-Leaved Sylvetta and Astro) and rape (Dwarf Essex)) in nursery system in Tennessee? and 2) Which functionally-important microbial populations are most affected by biofumigant cover crops? The results of the proposed research will improve the ability of stakeholders to develop a more effective nursery production system plan. As a result of this research, nursery producers will have new options for sustainable control of soilborne diseases.

    Project objectives:

    This project focuses on studying diseases of woody ornamental nursery crops with the ultimate goal of delivering sustainable soil-borne disease management strategies. Specific questions to be addressed by the proposed research include: 1) What are the effects of using biofumigant cover crops in nursery cropping system in Tennessee? and 2) Which functionally-important microbial populations (i.e. pathogens and their antagonists) are most affected by biofumigant cover crops? To answer these questions and provide nursery producers with a useful synthesis of our results the following main objective and specific objectives will be pursued:

    Main objective

    Assess environmentally friendly biofumigant cover crops for soilborne diseases and improved plant growth.

    Specific objectives

    1. Evaluating pathogenicity of Rhizoctonia solani and Phytophthora nicotianae to Brassicaceae biofumigant cover crops

            1.1 Evaluation of inoculation methods and inoculum level of Rhizoctonia solani to determine disease response

            1.2 Pathogenicity of Rhizoctonia solani and Phytophthora nicotianae to biofumigant cover crops

    1. Determining the effect of biofumigation in suppressing Rhizoctonia solani and Phytophthora nicotianae in woody ornamental nurseries

            2.1 Evaluating for the ability of Brassicaceae cover crops to release glucosinolate hydrolyze compounds and control R. solani and P. nicotianae under greenhouse conditions

            2.2 Evaluating sustainable approaches to control soilborne diseases in woody ornamental nurseries

    Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture or SARE.