Use of a Cover Crop to Reduce Soil Crusting and Improve Soybean Emergence

Project Overview

ONC22-101
Project Type: Partnership
Funds awarded in 2022: $39,859.00
Projected End Date: 08/31/2024
Grant Recipient: The Ohio State University
Region: North Central
State: Ohio
Project Coordinator:
Laura Lindsey
The Ohio State University

Commodities

No commodities identified

Practices

No practices identified

Proposal abstract:

Combating challenges that threaten crop production across variable growing conditions is vital to mitigating the impacts of abiotic constraints on food production, profitability, and stewardship of natural resources. Of particular concern is heavy and frequent rainfall in the North Central Region. Heavy rainfall after planting, especially followed by dry weather, can cause the soil to form a surface crust, resulting in a hard, compact, and brittle surface soil. Farmers face seedling death and loss of productivity. The long-term goal of this project is to promote the successful adoption of a cover crop prior to soybean planting to improve system resilience to intense rainfall and soil crusting. Objectives include: 1) examine the use of a cover crop to physically protect the soil surface and reduce soil crusting after heavy rainfall events, improving soybean emergence, survival, and ultimately yield, and 2) develop research-based interactive learning modules to empower farmers to make decisions regarding implementation of cover crops on their farm. Outcomes are expected to lead to the development of economically-sustainable strategies that promote stewardship of natural resources.

Project objectives from proposal:

Objectives of this project are to: 1) examine the use of a cover crop to physically protect the soil surface and reduce soil crusting after heavy rainfall events, improving soybean emergence, survival, and ultimately yield, and 2) develop research-based interactive learning modules to empower farmers to make decisions regarding implementation of cover crops on their farm.

Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture or SARE.