Producer-led, multi-topic, hands-on informational seminar to educate youth about sustainable and profitable meat goat production

Project Overview

YENC15-090
Project Type: Youth Educator
Funds awarded in 2015: $1,000.00
Projected End Date: 02/15/2017
Region: North Central
State: South Dakota
Project Manager:
Doug Pavel
Butte Vista Farm

Commodities

  • Animals: goats
  • Animal Products: meat

Practices

  • Education and Training: youth education

    Abstract:

    Results of April 2015 Youth Education Goat Care Seminar

    The youth education project titled “Producer-lead, Multi-topic, Hands-on Informational Seminar to Educate Youth About Sustainable and Profitable Meat Goat Production” was completed on Saturday, April 18th, 2015.  The event was held at the St. Onge Livestock Sale Barn in St. Onge, SD.  There were a total of 46 people in attendance of which 17 were youth, 12 were parents of those youth, 10 were members of the Black Hills Area Meat Goat Producers, and 7 were presenters.  

    You will find attached: the agenda and topic presenter information (It should be noted that Goat Rancher Carolina Noya was unable to attend and therefore SDSU Extension Small Livestock Educator Dave Ollila and Goat Rancher Doug Pavel presented her topic.),  the Power Point presentations of Doug Pavel and Doug Hogan, and photos from the hands on animal selection portion of the seminar.  Also attached is an announcement to the public of the results of the seminar.  This was released through the Butte/Lawrence County 4-H office and South Dakota State University Cooperative Extension.  

    Although Dr. Myers did not have a multi media presentation, there was a great deal of interactive discussion between the audience and Dr. Myers.  He covered internal parasite issues and the importance of doing fecal tests, CD/T vaccinations, effective external parasite control methods, and an extensive coverage of diseases including CAE, CL, Sore Mouth, Pneumonia, Iodine and Copper Deficiencies, and special care needed during pregnancy. 

    The farm tour proved to be a little difficult because it started to rain heavily, however, we did have a total of 12 youth, parents, and producers come to see the barns, feeders, and working system.  There was a great amount of discussion and exchange of ideas on what works and what doesn’t.  An open invitation was also offered to all in attendance at the seminar to stop in whenever it was convenient for them.  

    Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture or SARE.