DSU, UDE, UMES Joint State Program Project: Cover Crops and Soil Health & Beekeeping and Attracting Pollinators

Final report for NEDSU14-001

Project Type: PDP State Program
Funds awarded in 2014: $100,280.00
Funds awarded in 2015: $94,329.00
Funds awarded in 2016: $83,332.00
Projected End Date: 10/31/2017
Grant Recipient: Delaware State University
Region: Northeast
State: Delaware
State Coordinator:
John Clendaniel
Delaware State University
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Project Information

Summary:

This PDP state project featured dual-topic educational activities: cover crops & soil health, and beekeeping & attracting pollinators. There has been increasing interest among Delaware and Eastern Shore farmers for improving cover crop management and maximizing soil health and other benefits. This interest has created demand for ongoing comprehensive educational programming for farmers and the Ag service providers who advise them. Similarly, there has been demand for introductory level programs for farmers looking to start hives and/ or pollinator plots. This project was successfully able to fill these niches.

During this project, the Delaware Soil Health Partnership was formed. This group, comprised of staff from Delaware State University, the University of Delaware, NRCS, Sussex County Conservation District, and farmers, has recently expanded statewide. Members of these organizations contributed to the planning of educational activities, attended them, and then shared learned knowledge with farmers. Activities included demonstration plots, workshops, field days, fact sheets, and consultations On topics including recommended cover crop varieties and mixes, establishment and termination techniques and increasing soil health and other cover crop benefits. Additionally, Regional SARE Educator Jason Challandes, a key individual who led this project coordinated the 2016 Northeast SARE Regional Cover Crops for Soil Health Training.

Beekeeping and pollinator education focused largely on how to establish new hives, extract honey, and start new pollinator plots. Educational activities included establishing two demonstration hives at Delaware State University’s Outreach and Research Center, conducting open hive workshops, demonstrating honey extraction, professional presentations, and pollinator plot experiments/demonstrations.

In total, this project conducted 13 on-farm demonstrations, 5 focus groups, 5 professional presentations, and 15 workshops/field days attended by a total of 101 ag service providers and 87 farmers. The project team also administered 110 consultations and produced 3 factsheets.

In response to follow-up surveys and interviews, 16 service provider participants reported using cover crop and soil health knowledge gained by SARE programming to advise or educate 133 farmers who farm 15,000 acres. 34 farmers adapted their cover crop management using learned knowledge from SARE programming or from service providers who participated in SARE activities; 20 of these farmers planted new recommended cover crop mixes on 8,000 acres.

Two service provider participants in the pollinator education activities reported they shared learned knowledge, specifically about starting and maintaining a diverse pollinator plot, with 57 farmers who farm 90 acres. One service provider who participated in beekeeping education shared learned knowledge, specifically how to start a new hive and how to extract honey with 28 farmers. 15 farmer-beekeeper participants used a 21-frame honey extractor for the first time, increasing the amount of marketable honey and decreasing labor. 3 farmers established hives for the first time and an additional 3 farmers established pollinator plots for the first time. 

Performance Target:

Cover Crops and Soil Health

10 agriculture service providers from DE and MD who participate in the regional cover crops conference and/or post-conference follow-up trainings will use learned information to develop educational events and services including one-on-one consultations, workshops, presentations, and educational materials to reach 100 farmers.

Beekeeping and Attracting Pollinators

5 Ag service providers in Delaware and the Eastern Shore of Maryland will include knowledge and skills gained at trainings in their programs through workshops, trainings, the development of educational materials and one-on-one consultations delivered to 75 farmers.

Introduction:

Cover Crops and Soil Health

This project responded to ongoing interest among Ag service providers nationally and locally for increased knowledge and skills in cover crops and soil health. NRCS staff, extension professionals and others who work with farmers have an increased need and desire to improve their ability to assist farmers with cover crops and soil health; however, many professionals have only a basic understanding of the benefits of using cover crops as well as what farmers can do to adopt cover crops. Even for those who have a deeper knowledge base in cover crops, many are still unaware of details pertaining to their local area and different types of farmers.  Cover crop issues are extremely specific to local areas, the crops a farmer is growing, and the production system in which crops are grown. Also, farmers and service providers are often not aware of current research and suggestions for management practices that are available. Additionally research that has been done, even in a nearby state, may not apply to their area.  Service providers need to learn how to filter all of this information in order to best meet the needs of their farmer clients.

Local interest in cover crops and soil health programming was confirmed through a poster board survey conducted at Delaware Ag Week in January 2014 to gauge the interests of farmers and Ag service providers. 17 service providers and 53 farmers chose two of nine categories that they were most interested in. Of those, 9 service providers and 22 farmers chose cover crops. This was the highest response for service providers and the second highest for farmers.

This project responded to the local interests of service providers and farmers in cover crops with programs that included opportunities to participate in a regional conference and then offering educational opportunities in Delaware and the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Participants learned about the broad issues of cover crops and how to tailor their programming to their local area and for their farmers.

 

Beekeeping and Attracting Pollinators

Pollinators are an essential aspect of successfully growing fruits and vegetables. However, many farmers, especially those who manage small farms know little about attracting them.  Likewise, this is often an overlooked area for Ag service providers and the topic rarely comes up while reviewing a farmer’s operation. Generalist Ag service providers who do not work with bees could still benefit from and utilize knowledge gained in this area. Beekeeping is another way, in addition to promoting native pollinators, to ensure pollinators are on a farm when they are needed. The clear additional benefit of honeybees to farmers is the value added products from their honey.

A few years ago, DSU did a series of beekeeping workshops with very high participation levels at all of the events. Interest remained very high, but the funding for these activities ended and farmers and service providers were left without local educational opportunities. A honey extractor was also purchased by DSU during this time, but was never able to be utilized by farmers or service providers. Additional evidence of local interest was obtained using a poster board survey at Delaware Ag Week in January 2014 to gauge the interests of farmers and Ag service providers on multiple sustainable agriculture topics. 17 service providers and 53 farmers chose two of nine categories that they were most interested in. 6 service providers and 25 farmers chose beekeeping/pollinators. This was the highest selected category for farmers and the second highest among service providers.

This project educated Ag service providers and farmers directly through a series of workshops and demonstrations. Different workshops were offered to participants with varying levels of expertise, from novice to more experienced and offered opportunity for participants to progress in their knowledge.

Advisors/Cooperators

Click linked name(s) to expand/collapse or show everyone's info
  • Jason Challandes
  • Dr. Mark Vangessel
  • Berran Rodgers
  • Faith Kuhn
  • Thalia Pappas
  • Kathy Hossier

Educational Approach

Educational approach:

Cover Crops and Soil Health

This project built on the momentum of the National NRCS Cover Crops and Soil Health Conference. A team of Ag service providers and farmers was formed in Delaware to collaborate and plan educational activities. In addition to this, a major focus of the project was to attend the 2016 Northeast SARE Regional Cover Crops for Soil Health Training, held in Baltimore, MD to learn about current research and recommendations and plan how to best disseminate this information to others. This coordinator of this conference happened to be the key individual of this project, Jason Challandes. Therefore, much of the effort for this project was spent on coordinating the Regional Conference. Videos and PowerPoints of each session are available online: https://www.sare.org/Learning-Center/Conference-Materials/Cover-Crops-for-Soil-Health-Workshop

During this project, the Delaware Soil Health Project was formed. This group is made up of staff from Delaware State University, the University of Delaware, NRCS, Sussex County Conservation District, and farmers. This group has recently expanded statewide. The group met regularly to coordinate educational activities and determine the needs of the agricultural community. These activities included workshops, field days, demonstrations, and one-on-one consultations. The group also communicated to each other what farmers were adopting and what trends they were seeing.

Farmers and Ag service providers learned about many topics including:

  • Available varieties, their uses/benefits, and where they can be purchased
  • Mixes of cover crop varieties that are appropriate for different types of farming operations in their location
  • The timing of cover crop activities
  • General management techniques of successfully growing cover crops including details about the equipment that is needed
  • Financial Benefits of growing cover crops, including from decreasing fertilizers, improved crop productivity, and incentive programs
  • Benefits to soil health through BMP adoption
  • Environmental benefits including decreased run-off and erosion

 

Beekeeping and Attracting Pollinators

A major focus of the educational approach for these topics was by utilizing partnerships with the Delaware Beekeepers Association and the Delaware Department of Agriculture's Pollinator Program. The Delaware Beekeepers Association (DBA) is a statewide non-profit organization that regularly holds meetings and assists beekeepers. However, it was difficult for them to find new audiences. Our project addressed this issue by holding workshops and field days and connecting the experts at DBA with farmers and Ag service providers that otherwise would not have been introduced to the topic or be aware of the organization. Demonstration Hives were also established at DSU's Research and Outreach Center in Smyrna, DE and were used at open hive events and for one-on-one consultations. Additionally, a 21-frame honey extractor at the Research and Outreach Center was used for demonstrations and for beekeepers to get hands on practice and actually extract honey from their own hives.

Learning outcomes included:

  • Best Management Practices
  • Current Research and recommendations
  • Methods for increasing over-wintering
  • Honey production, extracting, and marketing techniques
  • Economics of beekeeping

In addition to workshops and field days, a focus of the pollinator program was on 5 demonstration sites on farms and at DSU's Research and Outreach Center in Smyrna, DE. Many varieties and mixes were tried using different plot preparation techniques, many based on suggestions from the Delaware Department of Agriculture's  (DDA) Pollinator program. Although, this could not constitute formal research, in the last year of the project we were able to make recommendations to DDA's pollinator program staff, which will guide future programming. This project also introduced utilizing pollinator plots on farms to DSU educators and farmer field day participants by establishing pollinator plots at DSU's Research and Outreach Center in Smyrna, DE. These plots will continue after the project assisting many other research and outreach projects that are being coordinated by DSU educators.

Learning outcomes included:

  • Types of pollinators
  • Benefits of increasing pollinators
  • Methods/crops

Milestones

Milestone #1 (click to expand/collapse)
What beneficiaries do and learn:

Year 1 Milestone Accomplishments – Cover Crops and Soil Health

Proposed number of farmer beneficiaries who will participate:
50
Proposed number of agriculture service provider beneficiaries who will participate:
10
Actual number of farmer beneficiaries who participated:
20
Actual number of agriculture service provider beneficiaries who participated:
53
Proposed Completion Date:
October 31, 2015
Status:
Completed
Date Completed:
October 31, 2015
Accomplishments:
  1. Cover crop demonstrations will be planted on DSU’s research farm (fall 2014 -spring 2015).

Complete. 3 acres were planted in September and October of 2015 in 216 5’X50’ plots (see photo below). Rye, barley, wheat, and rye/clover were each planted into no-till corn residue according to Delaware NRCS cost-share guidelines on three planting dates, three seeding rates, and two seeding methods (broadcast and drilled). Establishment has been successful and the results should be able to guide farmer recommendations. This project was coordinated with Amy Shober from UDEL to compliment her cover crop projects. The plots could not be planted in fall 2014 in time to meet NRCS planting date requirements because the cash crops were not ready to harvest. For 2015, a shorter season corn variety was planted in order to ensure the timely planting of cover crops.

  1. 10 ag service providers and 50 farmer participants will observe the demonstration plots and learn basic cover crop knowledge such as incentive programs, benefits, varieties, equipment needed etc. This will be done through regular DSU programming including a season extension workshop in Spring 2015, and Farm tour in late summer 2015.

Complete. Due to the delayed planting, there was no DSU programming after the plots were established. However, seven extension educators observed the progress of the various treatments and varieties. Four farmers toured the plots as well. Early results have been shared with four more extension educators, and five non-profit professionals. Although, these numbers were clearly lower than planned, the scope of the plots was significantly increased from what was planned and will offer far greater value to ag service providers and farmers in the next year.

At a meeting on February 27, 2015, 12 researchers and extension educators from DSU and UDEL, along with 3 NRCS staff met to discuss all of the cover crop projects in Delaware. Jason Challandes presented in detail the design of the plots as well as SARE work in the state. Additionally, the Regional Cover Crops workshop was described and initial discussions were had about how the team would form and how future SARE work would complement the work being done around the state.

Additionally, as part of the SARE summer tour, one of the stops included cover crop successes and failures of Jay Baxter, a very successful farmer in Delaware. In addition to the SARE Administrative Council and PDP group, several DSU service providers were present.

  1. 10 members of the group of Ag Service Providers/farmer(s) who will be attending the regional conference will meet for needs assessment and planning. (By summer 2015)

Complete. Maryland and Delaware decided to have separate teams. Nevin Dawson is coordinating the Maryland team and Jason Challandes is coordinating the Delaware team, so this project will focus on only Delaware’s team of 6. In Delaware, there has been regular communication between 3 farmers, 2 NRCS, 3 members of Delaware’s conservation district, and 6 extension educators about planning for future activities. The final list of team members that will actually attend the conference is still being determined, but there will be two extension educators (Mark VanGessel from UDEL and Jason Challandes from DSU), 1 farmer, 2 members from the Conservation Districts, and 1 NRCS. The larger team will work together to plan educational activities following the training.

New collaboration was formed with Delaware’s Conservation Districts, who are also currently focused on cover crops and soil health. Future educational activities will build on each other’s programming and higher level professional development training for the Conservation District employees is being planned.

(Added) 4. On-farm sessions on SARE summer tour.

Complete. 47 Ag service providers and 8 farmers learned about cover crop use, crop rotations, and nutrient Management.

 

Milestone #2 (click to expand/collapse)
What beneficiaries do and learn:

Year 1 Milestone Accomplishments - Beekeeping and Attracting Pollinators

Proposed number of farmer beneficiaries who will participate:
130
Proposed number of agriculture service provider beneficiaries who will participate:
25
Actual number of farmer beneficiaries who participated:
138
Actual number of agriculture service provider beneficiaries who participated:
23
Proposed Completion Date:
October 31, 2015
Status:
Completed
Date Completed:
September 26, 2015
Accomplishments:
  1. The project leader will meet with Delaware Beekeeper’s Association, the Delaware State Apiarist, and the Xerces society to help guide the program and future workshops. This will help to establish how in-depth the first workshops will be and at what learning level. (Fall 2014)

Complete. Upon early discussions, it became clear that The Delaware Beekeeper Association (DBA) is significantly the most active in communicating with beekeepers in Delaware. For that reason, collaboration was focused between the universities and DBA to provide educational activities. DBA regularly provides high-level support and education to beekeepers, so SARE activities have focused on those new to beekeeping and those who are considering starting beekeeping operations.

  1. 5 service providers and 30 farmers will learn about techniques and crops for attracting pollinators at a presentation by an appropriate expert (TBD) from the region. (December 2014)

Complete. Six service providers and seventeen farmers attended a session on March 9, 2015, entitled “Attracting Honeybee Pollinators” presented by Dr. Susan Yost, a locally renowned botanist and ecologist. SARE programming was also presented and participants indicated participation in future events and an interest to increase pollinator plants on their farm.

  1. 40 service providers and 400 farmers will receive promotional materials 2 months prior to each beekeeping workshop via email and direct contact. (Winter 2015 and Summer 2015)

Complete. 45 Ag service providers and 650 farmers received promotional material prior to workshops prior to the official start of the project in the summer of 2014 and then in the summer of 2015.

  1. Hives will be established at DSU’s Research farm and at 2 farms in Delaware and/or Maryland. (Spring 2015)

Complete. This milestone was delayed, but two permanent hives were established in an organic plot at DSU’s Outreach and Research Center in Spring 2016.

  1. 5 service providers and 40 farmers participate in 2 beginner/intermediate beekeeper workshops at Delaware State University’s Research farm and/or at on-farm locations and learn basic beekeeping information such as how to start hives, nutrition, and pest control Surveys will determine level of knowledge gained and needs for future workshops. (Fall 2014 and Fall 2015)

Complete. 16 service providers and 55 farmers participated in two workshops in September 2014 and September 2015. The first training was held prior to the official start of the project due to the needs of the collaborator, The Delaware Beekeeping Association.

Surveys were administered only at the second event. Of the 27 participants at the 2015 training, 19 farmers and 3 service providers completed the survey. When asked to rate their level of knowledge gained at the workshop, 10 chose considerable (45%) and 11 chose moderate (50%). 12 (42%) of the 22 responders were not currently beekeepers; 5 of which said that following the training, they were very likely to become beekeepers, and 6 said moderately or somewhat likely to become beekeepers. 11 farmers and 3 service providers said they were very – somewhat likely to use knowledge gained from the event. 

  1. 5 ag service providers and 10 farmers will learn how to establish their own hives at an on-farm demonstration at Delaware State University’s Research Farm. This process will be included in an educational video, and the hives will also be showcased at future workshops. (Early Spring 2015)

Complete. Since DSU had not yet established their own permanent hives, hives were brought to the farm for the two workshops. While wearing beekeeping suits, participants were able to closely inspect the hives and learn about the different features and bees. A video will be made when permanent hives are established.

Three honey extractor demonstrations were held (7/7/15, 7/17/15, and 9/15/15). There was a total of 3 extension educators who were previously unfamiliar with honey extraction and all indicated that they could now provide assistance to farmers. Eight farmers also participated and reported an increase in their marketable honey and a reduction in labor. A short video has been made demonstrating the 21-frame honey extractor.

Additionally, Jason Challandes made a presentation at a Delaware Beekeepers Association workshop on June 9, 2015. 28 farmers, 2 extension educators, and 5 non-profit representatives were present. The presentation highlighted the potential of increasing the amount of honey extracted in less time by using more efficient equipment, such as DSU’s honey extractor, which was used in demonstrations. Two of these farmers and one of the non-profit professionals used the extractor in July. Additionally, SARE programming and demonstrations were highlighted at the event.

  1. Delaware State University’s Research Farm will establish plants and techniques for attracting pollinators in Spring 2015. These demonstrations will be used for education and outreach throughout the length of the project at DSU’s programs at the research farm. (Spring 2015)

Complete. A pollinator plot was showcased through high tunnel educational activities. More significantly, a new collaboration has been formed with the Delaware Department of Agriculture and the new pollinator program. Their program has just started by hiring a consultant, but their funds and the scope of their original plan were very limited. Our new joint plan is to do several demonstrations at our Smyrna crop research farm as well as at our nearby livestock farm. We also plan on doing several on-farm demonstrations. These plots will be showcased at several trainings and used in publications.

  1. 10 Ag service providers and 50 farmers learn about types of pollinators, the benefits of attracting pollinators, crop varieties, and BMP’s for conserving and promoting pollinators at sessions held during high-profile DSU events attended by large numbers of farmers and ag service providers including a Season Extension Workshop (Spring 2015) and Open House Farm tour (Summer 2015).

Complete. 8 Ag Service Providers and 45 farmers toured the pollinator plot and joined a discussion of how to best attract pollinators during a High Tunnel workshop on May 15, 2015. The open house farm tour was canceled. Educational activities for this topic will ramp up in the next two years, especially as more demonstration sites are planted and educational activities with the Delaware Department of Agriculture begins.

Milestone #3 (click to expand/collapse)
What beneficiaries do and learn:

Year 2 Milestone Accomplishments - Cover Crops and Soil Health

Proposed number of farmer beneficiaries who will participate:
75
Proposed number of agriculture service provider beneficiaries who will participate:
40
Actual number of farmer beneficiaries who participated:
83
Actual number of agriculture service provider beneficiaries who participated:
58
Proposed Completion Date:
October 31, 2016
Status:
Completed
Date Completed:
October 31, 2016
Accomplishments:
  1. 10 members of the group of Ag Service Providers/farmer(s) who will be attending the regional conference will meet an additional time for final planning to maximize time at the conference. (Fall 2015)

Complete. On March 11, 2016, the DE extended team, made up of three farmers, three extension educators, one NRCS employee and three Conservation District employees met to discuss goals and future planning.

  1. 10 members of the group of Ag Service Providers/farmer(s) from DE and MD, will attend the regional cover crops and soil health conference, which will take place between November 2015 and April 2016. In addition to attending conference sessions, the group will get together to discuss future programming in DE and MD and how to best utilize the knowledge gained.

Complete. Three extension educators, two conservation district employees, and one NRCS employee from DE attended the regional conference in March 2016 and will apply for the follow-up grant to do educational activities over the next couple of years in Delaware.

  1. 10 members will complete Surveys following the regional conference that will determine the level of knowledge gained. (This will be done either at the conclusion of the conference or soon after).

Complete. Through verbal surveys, all six team members who attended the conference reported a significant level of knowledge gained. More broadly, regional cover crop workshop participants responded to a follow-up verification survey conducted 6 months after the workshop. These results are described fully in the Final Report for the conference grant: ENE 15-141. Briefly, 80% of respondents reported increased knowledge in cover crop species and mixes, cover crop establishment methods, cover crop termination method and cash crop establishment methoes, the role of cover crops in nutrient management and soil health improvement, and equipment innovations.

  1. Conference participants will receive follow-up assistance with implementation of cover crops programming in their states, and will respond to verification surveys about their efforts. Assistance will include helping coordinate educational activities, connecting participants with educational resources and experts, and contributing to programs.

 Complete. Assistance has been given periodically at requests from participants. Examples include providing links to online resources, contact information, and providing educational materials, such as PowerPoints.

  1. 40 Ag service participants and 400 farmers will receive promotional materials for future cover crops and soil health educational event(s). This includes events for both SARE state program events, as well as other cover crop events in Delaware and the Eastern Shore.

Complete. 45 service providers and 650 farmers received promotional materials for all state programming activities, plus Conservation District and University of Delaware activities. Events are now being coordinated together and advertised through each other’s networks.

  1. New Milestone. 50 farmers and 10 service providers attend soil health and cover crops workshops at DSU’s annual Profiting from a Few Acres (PFFA) Conference and at a stand-alone workshop and field day.

Complete. The state program had an opportunity to develop the agenda for this conference and held three sessions focusing on soil health and two on cover crops including a soil health overview by Fred Magdoff, an urban agriculture soil session, “Managing Soil Health under a high tunnel” by Lewis Jett, an introduction to cover crops session and one focusing on taking advantage of rolled-down cover crops. 67 Farmers and 12 service providers attended the sessions. This was held in Dover, DE on March 8, 2016.

A workshop and field day was held on September 29, 2016 at Delaware State University’s Outreach and Research Center in Smyrna, DE. Steve Groff, a renowned cover crop expert, researcher, and innovator gave four hour-long presentations: “How to choose the right varieties to achieve your goals”, “strategies to take cover crops to the next level”, “Utilizing summer cover crops”, and “Nutrient Management with Cover Cropping”. Four Nutrient Management credits and four Certified Crop Advisor credits were provided for participants. The workshop also included presentations about risk management, and SARE, NRCS, and Conservation District programs.

Following the presentations, participants toured the cover crop demonstration plots. There were 38 farmers and 27 Ag service provider participants. Unfortunately, only 20 participants (11 service providers and 9 farmers) submitted surveys, but they were very positive. 90% (18/20) reported a moderate or considerable level of knowledge gained about the range of topics taught 90% (18/20) reported that they were moderately or very likely to adopt or recommend a learned practice. The most common plans to use knowledge gained were using new varieties and mixes and to change timing. Participants also specifically stated that matching varieties with farmer objectives was extremely helpful. (This topic was focused on a response to farmer surveys done by Conservation District). Ag service providers stated that the program will be a good template for their own programs and will help them assist farmers better.

An additional presentation was given at a Chesapeake Bay Foundation “VoiCeS” event on November 3, 2015. This presentation included a broad overview of cover crop practices and benefits as well as a general description of sustainable agriculture in general and SARE programs. There were six farmers and nine service provider participants.

 7. Cover crop demonstrations will be planted on 2 farms in Delaware and/or Maryland (Fall 2015-Spring 2016).

Complete. Demonstrations were established at DSU’s Outreach and Research center rather than private farms in fall 2015. Four varieties of cover crops were planted in a three-acre section, using two seeding methods, three seeding rates, and three seeding dates, based on the guidelines of NRCS. Summer cover crops were also planted in late spring and fall varieties in October. These were showcased at the workshop in September.

  1. 25 farmers and 5 Ag service providers will tour the on-farm demonstrations via a bus tour. The participants will receive training about implementation and real world experiences. Stops on the tour will be chosen to showcase diverse uses of cover crops and the farmer hosts will describe challenges and successes. Participants will be able to see first hand varying levels of establishment and biomass and relate them to the farmers’ planting dates and seeding rates. Participants will additionally increase their ability to connect particular cover crop varieties and mixes with the farmers’ goals for using them. 
    Canceled. This was deemed to be unnecessary to meet our goals and we were able for participants to get this information at workshops and field days. The research facilities are able to have many different treatments, varieties, planting methods, seeding rates, and seeding methods in a small area allowing for farmers to quickly tour plots. Additionally, farmers can have more time to change experiences at workshops during times of years that are less busy for them.
  2. 10 Ag service providers will complete short surveys or interviews to determine changes in their ability and confidence to serve farmers.
    Complete. 

    Verification was done throughout the year by interview and email. 19 Ag service providers provided quantitative and qualitative information about educational activities and farmer adoption. All 19 noted a strongly increased ability to recommend cover crop varieties and mixes to particular farmers, some of whom have adopted their recommendations. . Additionally, 8 reported an increase of knowledge in seeding rate recommendations, 6 in termination methods, 6 in interseeding methods, and 3 in encouraging soil health conditions.

Milestone #4 (click to expand/collapse)
What beneficiaries do and learn:

Year 2 Milestone Accomplishments - Beekeeping and Attracting Pollinators

Proposed number of farmer beneficiaries who will participate:
75
Proposed number of agriculture service provider beneficiaries who will participate:
50
Actual number of farmer beneficiaries who participated:
101
Actual number of agriculture service provider beneficiaries who participated:
41
Proposed Completion Date:
October 31, 2016
Status:
Completed
Date Completed:
October 31, 2016
Accomplishments:
  1. 5 service providers and 40 farmers will participate in 2 beekeeping workshops at Delaware State University’s Research farm and/or at on-farm locations. Year 1 workshops will help gauge what level of training will take place. Surveys will determine level of knowledge gained, needs for future workshops and behavior change due to prior trainings. (Winter and Summer 2016)

Complete. A session entitled, “The Role of Honeybees on Your Farm” was held at DSU’s small farm conference in March 2016 with 27 farmers and 4 Ag service providers. 

The second workshop was held September 17, 2016 at Delaware State University’s Outreach & Research Center in Smyrna, DE. 17 farmers and 4 Ag service providers attended classroom presentations and suited up to observe the hives that were established earlier in the year. Participants learned about the different parts of the hives, how to maintain them, care for the bees, and to learn what to look for when assessing the health of the bees. Ten participants (2 service providers and 8 farmers) submitted surveys showing 90% (9/10) had gained a considerable amount of knowledge 70% (7/10) said they were very likely to use knowledge gained. Six of the ten were not currently beekeepers; 67% (4/6) said they were very likely to use knowledge and skills gained to become beekeepers within the next year.

Additionally, four farmers participated in a honey extractor demonstration in spring 2016, and all reported increased knowledge of and intention to extract honey(?). 

  1. 10 Ag service providers and 50 farmers learn about types of pollinators, the benefits of attracting pollinators, crop varieties, and BMP’s for conserving and promoting pollinators at sessions held during high-profile DSU events attended by large numbers of farmers and ag service providers including a Season Extension Workshop (Spring 2016) and Open House Farm tour (Summer 2016).

Complete. A plenary session about attracting pollinators was held at DSU’s small farm conference in March, 2016 with 75 farmers and 39 Ag service provider participants.

Additionally, a larger demonstration sight of pollinator plants was planted in spring, 2016 adjacent to a 10-acre organic plot at the DSU Research and Outreach Center in Smyrna, DE, which also serves as a feeding sight for the newly established hives. Participants at the beekeeping and cover crops workshop toured these plots. An additional plot of a honeybee forage mix was planted in October, 2016 and will be showcased in the spring of 2017. The results plots also serve to guide the Delaware Department of Agriculture’s recommendations.

  1. New Milestone. In the new collaboration with the Delaware Department of Agriculture and their state pollinator plan, the state program will work with a team made up of a crop/Ag consultant from DSU, a plant specialist, and an insect specialist to analyze four pilot farms for their potential to support pollinators and make recommendations for improvement. Pilot farms will make adaptations, including plantings. The first site will be analyzed in summer 2016 and pre-and-post-treatment qualitative comparisons will be made. These results will be used in future educational programs.

    Complete in fall of 2017. 5 Demonstration plots were done in 2016 and 2017. Although a complete quantification of results proved to be too complicated, qualitative comparisons between treatments were clear. The results showed the best methods for plot preparation and the mix of seeds for producing flowering plants throughout most of the growing season. The best results we found were by spring tilling, allowing weed seeds to sprout, spraying with roundup, tilling again, and then planting a mix of zinnias, buckwheat, and 2 types of sunflowers. In the fall perennial mix could be added to provide a permanent pollinator pasture. This information was shared with the DDA pollinator program and a fact sheet and video were produced.

  2. 10 Ag service providers and 50 farmers respond to verification surveys and interviews

    Complete. 4 Ag service providers and 20 farmers participated in interviews. Results from the interviews are summarized in the Performance Target Outcomes. In this project, attracting pollinators became less of a focus because there was much more interest from farmers and ASP's in cover cropping and beekeeping. Additionally, the results of the demonstration plots were not clear until late summer of 2017.

Milestone #5 (click to expand/collapse)
What beneficiaries do and learn:

Year 3 Milestone Accomplishments – Cover Crops and Soil Health

Proposed Completion Date:
October 31, 2017
Status:
Completed
Date Completed:
October 31, 2017
Accomplishments:
  1. 40 Ag service participants and 400 farmers will receive promotional materials for future cover crops and soil health educational event(s). (Fall 2016-Spring 2017)
    Complete.

  2. New Milestone. The Delaware Soil Health Partnership will meet regularly to share current research/recommendations, and coordinate future activities.
    Complete. 13 Ag service provider individuals met at least 5 times throughout the year and learned about current research/recommendations in Delaware. Additionally the grouped planned and coordinated educational activities this year and helped to structure the next 3-year state program. 
  3. 5 Service Providers and 25 farmers will learn about cover crop economics, timing, current research/recommendations, variety mixes etc. at a workshop that will take place at DSU’s research farm. The demonstration plots will also be highlighted. (Fall 2016-Spring 2017)
    Revised.
     17 Service Providers and 36 farmers toured and received information/recommendations about the demonstration plots, including timing, seeding rates, and suggested mixes for specific results plus others on a self-guided tour with directions from the website. During this time of the project, a shift in the plan took place. The Delaware Soil Health Partnership started to expand and became more formalized. At a meeting with the group on January 20, 2017, it was determined that there was a great need for the Delaware SARE state programming to continue for another 3 years and that we needed to take a longer time-frame view. The group decided that Delaware activities should be increasingly coordinated together with the various groups so that activities were not being duplicated. This planned workshop would have been very similar to a Conservation District Workshop on February 15, 2017. However, the demonstration plots were expanded and a layout of the plots is available online, encouraging guests to do a self-guided tour or meet with the SARE Educator. http://www.deccnetwork.com/sites/dsu/ Therefore, total number of visitors is not known. The 2017 plots included three planting dates, 11 varieties/mixes, and used 3 types of equipment. 
  4. 30 Ag service providers will participate in a 1-day train-the-trainer workshop modeled on the Northeast SARE Regional Cover Crops for Soil Health Training. Professionals from NRCS, County Conservation Districts, and Cooperative Extension at DSU, UDEL, UMES and UMD will be invited to attend. The workshop will include presentations by content area specialists, discussions among service providers about farmers’ successes and challenges with cover crops and soil health improvement, and time for planning future educational programming. Jason Challandes will lead a planning team that includes NRCS, Conservation Districts, UDEL, and DSU professionals, and in fact, discussions have already begun with the involved parties. (Fall 2016-Spring 2017)

    Postponed, but Completed. At Delaware Soil Health Partnership Meetings, it was revealed that there was a slow effort to get more of a statewide effort for soil health outreach, specifically for Kent and New Castle County Conservation District Staff. At that point only Sussex County's CD had an active program. This is where the Delaware SARE State programming was able to fill a  niche and provide training to the CD staff as well as additional Ag Providers in the other counties. At this point, the staff from the other counties were not yet able to participate, so this event was postponed. A train-the trainer workshop and planning meeting was held on November 1, 2017, and will be reported in next three year project.

  5. New Milestone. 5 Ag service providers and 25 farmers will attend a cover crops session and/or a soil health workshop at DSU's annual Profiting from a few Acres Conference.
    Complete. 3 Ag service providers and 7 farmers learned about establishment/management techniques and how to choose the appropriate cover crops and mixes to meet their objectives. 6 Ag service providers and 13 farmers learned about soil health principles including infiltration, compaction, erosion, and nutrient management.
  6. The Regional SARE educator will develop a GIS map for the Delaware State University’s 200 acre Research Farm that delineates the various cover crop varieties as well as the pollinator attractors, location of hives, current crops, and season extension activities that were a result of the previous SARE project. This map will be available online and at the farm for future events. (By spring 2017)

Revised. This milestone will not be feasible because of the continually changing nature of DSU’s Research and Outreach Center and the temporal delay in available satellite images.  However, a map of the cover crop plots was published online so that visitors can self-tour or be guided through the plots. This will be updated annually.

7. 10 Ag service providers and 50 farmers will receive an educational video that showcases the on-farm demonstration plots throughout the length of the project (By Summer 2017).
Revised, but completed in fall 2017. Due to the complexity of the project and results, it was decided that a fact sheet would be more useful. 12 Ag service providers and 35 farmers received the factsheet and learned about the results of a planting date and seeding rate evaluation. .CoverCrops
However a video was just recently done showing a soil analysis and demonstration comparing conventionally tilled soil with no-till cover-cropped soil. This will be recorded on the next three-year project

8. New Milestone. 25 Ag Service providers and will learn about current cover crop research related to planting dates and seeding rates at 2 professional presentations. (Spring 2017)
Complete. 
A total of 33 Ag Service Providers attended a presentation at the Agriculture Research Director's conference on April 3, 2017 and at a DSU presentation for researchers on April 21, 2017. Participants learned about current research results and received recommendations.

New Milestone. 10 Ag service providers and 30 farmers will learn how to do on-farm research, specifically related to cover crops and will learn about current cover crop research related to planting dates and seeding rates at a soil health workshop. (Summer 2017)

Complete. 
12 Ag service providers and 41 farmers learned about current research results in Delaware and received recommendations at a workshop in Georgetown, DE on August 10. They also learned the benefits of on farm research and strategies for success.

10. Verification of service provider actions and farmer adoption will be done directly with 10 Ag service providers and farmers who participate in educational programs on an ongoing basis at appropriate opportunities until September 2017. This will be done at meetings and events as well as by phone following events, as needed.
Complete. 

Verification was done throughout the year by interview and email. 13 Ag service providers provided quantitative and qualitative information about educational activities and farmer adoption. This information is reported in the Performance Target Outcomes section.

Milestone #6 (click to expand/collapse)
What beneficiaries do and learn:

Year 3 Milestone Accomplishments - Beekeeping and Attracting Pollinators

Proposed Completion Date:
October 31, 2017
Status:
Completed
Date Completed:
October 31, 2017
Accomplishments:
  1. 3 Ag service providers and 30 farmers will participate in 2 Workshops at Delaware State University’s Research farm and/or at on-farm locations. One workshop is intended for advanced and experienced beekeepers only. Surveys will determine level of knowledge gained, needs for future workshops and behavior change due to prior trainings. (Winter and Summer 2017)
    Revised. 4 Ag service providers and 5 farmers learned how to extract honey using a 21-frame extractor at 1 of 2 demonstrations on 7/29/17 and 9/14/17. 6 Ag service providers and 13 farmers learned about the supplies needed to start beekeeping, management techniques to protect bees from environmental influences, and how to over winter bees. During this project, we found that the niche that we filled was introducing the topic to prospective beekeepers and connecting them with experts in the Delaware Beekeepers Association. At the most recent Beekeeping workshop at DSU's Outreach and Research Center in September 2017, 12 of 14 survey respondents reported that they did not have bees and that all 12 of them were very likely to start hives. Comments on surveys also said that one of the best positives of the workshop is that they are now more aware of the resources in the state including the DBA. The higher level trainings for experienced beekeepers are now being done by the DBA and their new president Kathy Hossier. Although this state project is ending, DSU will continue to hold open hive workshops at the DSU's Outreach and Research Center.
  2. New Milestone. The state program continues collaborative work with the Delaware Department of Agriculture and the pollinator team to analyze the three remaining farms for their potential to support pollinators and make recommendations for improvement. These farms will make the adaptations including plantings. The recommendations of these three farms as well as the results of the first pilot farm will be included in the educational programs described in milestone 3.
    (Spring to Summer 2017)
    Complete in fall of 2017. 5 Demonstration plots were done in 2016 and 2017. Although a complete quantification of results proved to be too complicated, qualitative comparisons between treatments were clear. The results showed the best methods for plot preparation and the mix of seeds for producing flowering plants throughout most of the growing season. The best results we found were by spring tilling, allowing weed seeds to sprout, spraying with roundup, tilling again, and then planting a mix of zinnias, buckwheat, and 2 types of sunflowers. In the fall, a perennial mix could be added to provide a permanent pollinator pasture. Our demonstrations also showed that the expensive blends, specifically made for bee forage or to attract pollinators, which contained 10-20 seed varieties proved to be the weakest performing. This information was shared with the DDA pollinator program and a fact sheet and video were produced. These will continue to be distributed. At least 3 of the sites will be maintained as pollinator plots indefinitely. A new plot is being established at DSU's Outreach and Research Center and will be included in Delaware Master Gardener's new pollinator activities and trainings.
  3. 10 Ag service providers and 50 farmers learn about types of pollinators, the benefits of attracting pollinators, crop varieties, and BMP’s for conserving and promoting pollinators at sessions held during high-profile DSU events attended by large numbers of farmers and ag service providers including a Season Extension Workshop (Spring 2017) and Open House Farm tour (Summer 2017).
    Revised. Both of these events were canceled due to a lack of funding at DSU. However, throughout the year, the plots were toured at other events and by one-on-one consultations. 8 Ag service providers and 31 farmers learned about recommended pollinator mixes and techniques for producing successful plots that flower throughout most of the growing season. 
  4. 10 Ag service providers and 50 farmers receive two educational videos produced by the project leader (one for beekeeping and one for attracting pollinators)
    Revised, but Completed in fall of 2017. It was decided that simple fact sheets were sufficient for the information and easier to distribute. 17 Ag service providers and 66 farmers received at least one of the two factsheets and learned about how to establish and manage a new hive and/or how to create pollinator habitat using seed mixes and plot preparation to produce successful plots that flower throughout most of the growing season and also creating a sustaining perennial plot. These will continue to be distributed.Pollinator-plot
    Establishing-a-beehive
  5. The Regional SARE educator will develop a GIS map for the Delaware State University’s 200 acre Research Farm that delineates the various pollinator attractors, and the location of hives, as well as the rest of the current crops, cover crops, and season extension activities that were a result of the previous SARE project. This map will be available online at the farm for future events. (By spring 2017)

Omitted or Revised. This milestone will not be feasible because of the continually changing nature of DSU’s Research and Outreach Center as well as the temporal delay in available satellite images. A simpler and broader GIS map may be developed to show SARE’s and DSU’s projects. 

  1. 10 ag service providers and 50 farmers respond to end of project verification surveys and interviews (By September 2017)
    Complete. 8 service providers and 37 farmers participated in interviews. Results are described in the performance target section below.

Milestone Activities and Participation Summary

Educational activities conducted by the project team:

ActivityYear 1Year 2Year 3Total
Consultations 22 30 58 110
Curricula, factsheets or educational tools 0 3 3
On-farm demonstrations 3 4 6 13
Study circle / focus groups 5 5
Webinars, talks and presentations 1 1 3 5
Workshop / field days 5 6 4 15

Beneficiaries who particpated in the project’s educational activities and events:

AudienceYear 1Year 2Year 3Total Individuals
Extension 63 42 57 45
NRCS 6 11 48 12
Researchers 0 7 23 17
Nonprofit 7 12 10 8
Agency 0 8 10 5
Service providers (other or unspecified) 0 23 7 14
Farmers / ranchers 158 184 118 87

Participation Summary:

101 Number of agricultural educator or service providers reached through education and outreach activities

Learning Outcomes

21 Agricultural service providers reported changes in knowledge, skills and/or attitudes as a result of their participation.
65 Farmers reported changes in knowledge, attitudes, skills and/or awareness as a result of their participation
21 Ag service providers intend to use knowledge, attitudes, skills and/or awareness learned through this project in their educational activities and services for farmers
Key areas in which the service providers (and farmers if indicated above) reported a change in knowledge, attitudes, skills and/or awareness::

Year 1 key areas of learning verified
Beekeeping and Attracting Pollinators
Based on surveys completed at the workshop on 9/26/15:
3 Ag Service Providers increased their knowledge of extracting honey and the equipment used to do so.
8 farmers indicated an increase in knowledge and intention of honey extraction at demonstrations.
19 farmers indicated an increase in beekeeping management intention to use knowledge gained
11 farmers indicated that they were very, moderately, or somewhat likely to start beekeeping
3 Service providers / farmers indicated an increase in beekeeping management and intention to use knowledge gained

Year 2 Key areas of learning verified
Cover Crops and Soil Health
6 team members who attended the regional conference reported a significant level of knowledge and intention to use new learning
10 service providers who attended the September 2016 cover crops workshop with Steve Groff reported a moderate or considerable level of knowledge gained about cover crop mixes, matching varieties with objectives, and using summer cover crops.
8 farmers who attended the September cover crops workshop reported a moderate or considerable level of knowledge gained how nutrient management with cover crops, using summer cover crops and how to choose which cover crops are right for you.
9 service providers who attended the September Cover Crops workshop reported that they were moderately or very likely to included a learned practice in their farmer outreach such as recommending mixes for particular types of farmers and including summer cover crops in crop rotations.
9 farmers who attended the September Cover Crops workshop reported that they were moderately or very likely to adopt a learned practice such as using new varieties and mixes and changing timing.

Beekeeping and Attracting Pollinators
Based on surveys completed at the workshop on 9/17/16.
1 Ag Service Providers increased their knowledge of extracting honey and the equipment used to do so
4 farmers indicated an increase in knowledge and intention of honey extraction at demonstrations.
10 farmers indicated an increase in beekeeping management and intention to use knowledge gained
4 farmers indicated that they were very likely to start beekeeping

Year 3 Key areas of learning verified
Cover Crops and Soil Health
Based on data collected during end-of-project interviews
11 Ag service reported an increased ability to recommend cover crop varieties and mixes to particular farmers

Beekeeping and Attracting Pollinators
At the Beekeeping workshop at DSU’s Outreach and Research Center in September 2017, 14 participants completed surveys. Responses were:
12 of 14 (86%) of survey respondents reported that they did not currently have hives and all 12 of them reported that they were "very likely" to establish new hives. Respondents also reported that one of the most helpful things about the SARE programming was learning about all of the resources in the state to help new beekeepers.
9 of 14 (64%) of survey respondents reported a considerable amount on knowledge gained in how to establish new hives, the equipment needed, and how to mange them throughout the year.
4 Ag service providers and 5 farmers reported an increased knowledge in extracting honey via interview.
3 Ag service providers reported an increased knowledge of seed mixes and plot preparation to establish and manage pollinator plots and had intent to include this information in programming.

Performance Target Outcomes

Performance Target Outcomes - Service Providers

Activities for farmers conducted by service providers:
ActivityYear 1Year 2Year 3Total
Consultations 47 47
On-farm demonstrations 4 4
Study circles / focus groups 2 2
Webinars, talks and presentations 1 1
Workshops and field days 3 3
19 Total number of agricultural service provider participants who used knowledge and skills learned through this project (or incorporated project materials) in their educational activities, services, information products and/or tools for farmers
218 Farmers reached through participant's programs
Total amount of production these farmers manage:
15100
Performance target outcome for service providers narrative:

Cover Crops and Soil Health

Verification was conducted in years 2 and 3 by interview and emailed surveys. Via interviews, 10 out of 24 Ag service providers gave quantitative and qualitative information about educational activities and farmer adoption. Survey questions about advising farmers with knowledge gained and farmer adoption were sent to 33 Ag service providers, who did not participate in interviews and 6 responded. All 16 interview and survey respondents reported using knowledge gained to advise or educate 133 farmers, who farm 15,000 acres via 3 workshops, a focus group, 4 demonstration plots, and 33 one-on-one consultations. All 16 have advised farmers about cover crop varieties and mixes, and 11 reported farmer adoption of recommendations. Additionally, 7 of the service providers educated farmers about seeding rate recommendations, 6 about termination methods, 5 about interseeding methods, and 3 about encouraging soil health conditions.

Beekeeping and Attracting Pollinators

Service provider and farmer participants in these educational tracks were also interviewed in years 2 and 3. 3 service providers responded to interviews (2 for pollinators and 1 for beekeeping). The 2 pollinator educators reported that they shared learned knowledge, specifically about starting and maintaining a diverse pollinator plot, with 57 farmers who farm 90 acres via a presentation, a demonstration, and 6 consultations. The beekeeping educator shared learned knowledge, specifically how to start a new hive and how to extract honey with 28 farmers via a focus group and 8 consultations.

Performance Target Outcomes - Farmers

Target #1

Target: number of farmers who will make a change/adopt of practice:
20
Target: the change or adoption the farmers will make:
Cover Crops and Soil Health: 20 farmers will increase cover crop acreage for a total of 200 acres.
Target: total size/scale of farmers these farmers manage:
200 acres
Verified: number of farmers who made a change/adopted a practice:
1
Verified: size/scale of farms these farmers manage:
1

Target #2

Target: number of farmers who will make a change/adopt of practice:
20
Target: the change or adoption the farmers will make:
Beekeeping and Attracting Pollinators: 20 Farmers will improve hive management practices; 4 will add hives to their farm.
Target: total size/scale of farmers these farmers manage:
N/A
Verified: number of farmers who made a change/adopted a practice:
1
Verified: size/scale of farms these farmers manage:
1
57 Farmers made a change/adopted a practice as a result of this project
Size/scale of farms affected by this project:
10000 Acres
Performance target outcome for farmers narrative:

Cover Crops

Farmer adoption was verification by reports from service provider participants and direct contact (interview or survey) with farmers who participated in the project’s educational events. Via interviews, 10 out of 24 Ag service providers and 8 out of 19 farmers gave quantitative and qualitative information about farmer adoption. Survey questions about adoption were sent to 45 farmers and 33 ag service providers who did not participate in interviews. 13 farmers and 6 service providers responded to the surveys.

In total, 34 farmers adapted their cover crop management using learned knowledge. The most common change in behavior was to use recommended mixes. Many farmers were using a single variety, often a grass such as rye, wheat, or barley. Adopted mixes often included a legume and brassica, especially tillage radish. 20 farmers have planted new mixes on 8,000 acres. Other practices are difficult for farmers to change, such as seeding timing (due to cash crops), seeding methods (due to equipment constraints), and seeding rates (due to subsidy requirements).

Beekeeping and Attracting Pollinators

Data about adoption of new practices related to beekeeping and attracting pollinators was collected in a similar manner – via reports from service providers and direct contact with farmer participants. In total, 15 farmer-beekeepers used a 21-frame honey extractor for the first time increasing the amount of marketable honey and decreasing labor. 3 farmers established hives for the first time, and an additional 3 farmers established pollinator plots for the first time. 

Additional Project Outcomes

Number of grants applied for that built upon this project:
Year 1Year 2Year 3Total
2 2
Number of new working collaborations:
Year 1Year 2Year 3Total
3 3
1 New working collaboration
Additional Outcomes Narrative:

 

New collaborations were formed with Sussex County and Kent County Conservation Districts for work on cover crop education and future events will be complimentary or collaborative. Additionally, at least one representative from each district was part of Delaware’s cover crop team that attended the Baltimore training and collaborate on follow-up activities.

An active collaboration has been implemented with the Delaware Beekeepers Association to provide regular educational programs for farmers. So far 2 joint workshops have been held and the honey extractor demonstrations were coordinated together.

A new joint project has also been arranged between the SARE program and a pollinator consultant for the Delaware Department of Agriculture. This joint project plans to increase demonstration plots and educational activities.

In year three, the Delaware Soil Health became more formalized and an agreement was made with the SARE state program to continue professional development statewide and include all three county's Conservation District staff, as well as coordinating farmer education activities.

Success stories:

*Industry service providers who attended trainings reported large acreage of adoption of learned cover crop management and reported at least 8,000 acres of recommended cover crop mixes planted by 20 farmers.

* The greatest success stories, in addition to seeing farmer adoption, were the outcomes of the regional conference and the prospects for future professional development, especially with Kent and New Castle County Conservation District staff who, generally have little experience with soil health and cover crops and are being encouraged to ramp up outreach. 

* At Delaware State University beekeeping and pollinator programming will continue in the future by other extension educators and cover cropping and soil health issues have been included in three extension educators programs and demonstration and research plots.

Assessment of Project Approach and Areas of Further Study:

It was a difficult three year project to combine a dual topic project with the coordination of the regional cover crops conference. Additionally, the attracting pollinators topic turned out to be largely separate from beekeeping so that it was difficult to focus on. It is not extremely difficult to plan activities in multiple topic areas, but creating the state plans and then reporting on them became a significant burden. I would not recommend it to others.

SARE Outreach

Outreach about SARE:

Information about SARE grant programs and information resources was shared at the programs and events listed below.

Year 1 (2014-2015) SARE Outreach Activities

Event/Activity

Number of Contacts with:

Farmers

Ag. Professionals

NESARE Funding Opportunities - Ag Week 1/15/15

37

 

11

 

SARE Grants - During session at poultry conference 3/7/15

7

1

SARE Grant Options - On Delaware Extension Professional Development Tour 9/25/15

 

24

Grant Writing Training 2/27/15

 

14

SARE Grants - DSU's state Fair Booth 7/23/15

11

9

Individual Consultations

14

5

 Year 2 (2015-2016) SARE Outreach Activities

Event/Activity

Number of Contacts with:

Farmers

Ag. Professionals

Presentation at Chesapeake Bay Foundation event 11/3/15

6

14

Annie’s Dinner Presentation Salisbury, MD 2/18/16

12

4

Vendor DSU Conference 3/8/16

67

19

Vendor DSU Forestry Conference 4/13/16

34

22

Presentation at Beekeeping Workshop 9/17/16

17

4

Presentation at Cover Crops Workshop 9/29/16

39

34

Individual Consultations

8

15

Year 3 (2016-2017) SARE Outreach Activities

Event/Activity

Number of Contacts with:

Farmers

Ag. Professionals

Delaware Ag Week vendor

32

15

PFFA Vendor and presentation 3/14-3/15/17

57

17

Delaware State Fair Vendor 7/20/17

23

21

Presentation at Soil Health and On-farm research Workshop 8/10/17

41

12

Presentation at Beekeeping Workshop 9/17/16

17

6

Individual Consultations

13

18

 

 

 

 

Recieved information about SARE grant programs and information resouces:

Audience Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Total
Service providers 64 97 55 216
Farmers 69 175 165 409
Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture or SARE.