2018 Colorado State University PDP Project

Final report for WSP17-005

Project Type: PDP State Program
Funds awarded in 2017: $37,999.35
Projected End Date: 12/31/2019
Grant Recipient: Colorado State University
Region: Western
State: Colorado
State Coordinators:
Dr. Steven Newman
Colorado State University
Co-Coordinators:
William Nobles
Colorado State University
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Project Information

Abstract:

Colorado Sustainable Agricultural Professional Development Program, (2018)
a ) Topic(s): Colorado PDP goals during the next year (2018) are; 1) assess the knowledge level and educational needs of professionals associated with sustainable agriculture, 2) provide sustainable agriculture in-depth training for agricultural educators and producers across the state through mini-grants and training, 3) provide support promoting and potentially hosting educational workshops, 4) and facilitate proposal development in response to grant opportunities. Specific topics that will be covered include, but are not limited to, food and cropping system diversification, energy efficiency, farmer networks, and range and livestock integrated resource management.

b) Context, justification and assumptions: The objectives of the Colorado SARE Professional Development Program are to provide knowledge and communication of SARE information throughout the state. The development of sound agriculture practices should involve not just changes in the technology, but also a transformation of producers' attitude towards farming and modifications within the practice. This process requires, identifying critical knowledge gaps that hinder the adoption of sustainable practices, and re-thinking approaches to disseminate concepts on sustainable farming systems. Sustainable agriculture in Colorado is by its very
nature a multidisciplinary field and will incorporate subject matter from agriculture, natural resources, social sciences and related disciplines.

Information derived by diverse audiences such as the annual SW Marketing Conference, Colorado County Agents Association, Colorado Extension Planning and Reporting Units (PRU) also known as work teams make up the Colorado Advisory Council. This determines a
statewide assessment of training needs for Extension faculty and agency staff (e.g., NRCS, Conservation Districts and NGO’s) and if necessary this is accomplished by phone, email and web based survey technologies.

c) Stakeholder and partner involvement: Colorado sustainable agriculture stakeholders consist of a large array of people including agricultural producers (farmers, ranchers), rural landowners, NGO’s, agricultural professionals (Extension, CSFS, and NRCS). Integrating stakeholder involvement into all events pertaining to sustainable agriculture continues to be an important component of the educational objective for the Colorado PDP Coordinators. The CSU Extension PRU’s and Colorado PDP program collaborate and provide considerable synergy. In addition, we have solicited advice primarily from agriculture professionals with the presumption they were reflecting the input of producer stakeholders with whom they worked and interacted. The PDP coordinators are formalizing an advisory committee structure by assuring we have representation from Extension, agriculture professionals and producers to help set priorities, determine mini-grant recipients, and provide feedback/input.

Project Objectives:

Methods and Results section:

Objective 1) Enhancement of the knowledge-base and skills of Colorado agricultural professionals interested in sustainable agricultural practices: In 2018, provide a competitive-mini grants program in sustainable agriculture. We expect to support six competitive mini-grants to conduct demonstrations projects, workshops, and/or farm tours. Provide four
to six travel scholarships to regional and national conferences/workshops related to sustainable agriculture.

Objective 2) Increase clientele's understanding of sustainable agriculture practices through educational methods: A comprehensive review of the knowledge gaps existing among the Colorado’s sustainable community will help design approaches to develop and deliver information related to alternative management practices. This will be accomplished through workshops, training, and interaction with professionals and producers.

Objective 3) Promote awareness of WSARE grant opportunities: To increase the level of involvement of agricultural professional across Colorado we will distribute materials and promote activities related to sustainable agriculture through the COWSARE web page which will require extensive updating.

Advisors

Click linked name(s) to expand
  • Brian Kailey (Educator)
  • Adrian Card (Educator)
  • Kara Harders (Educator)
  • Dr. Rebecca Jablonski (Educator and Researcher)

Education

Educational approach:

Educational Methods:

Objective 1) Enhancement of the knowledge-base and skills of Colorado agricultural professionals interested in sustainable agricultural practices: In 2019, provide a competitive-mini grants program in sustainable agriculture. We expect to support six competitive mini-grants to conduct demonstrations projects, workshops, and/or farm tours. Provide up to five travel scholarships to regional and national conferences/workshops related to sustainable agriculture.

Objective 2) Increase clientele's understanding of sustainable agriculture practices through educational methods: A comprehensive review of the knowledge gaps existing among the Colorado’s sustainable community will help design approaches to develop and deliver information related to alternative management practices. This will be accomplished through workshops, training, and interaction with professionals and producers by, a sustainable conference focusing on the effects climate variability on range, livestock and crop production.

Objective 3) Promote awareness of WSARE grant opportunities: To increase the level of involvement of agricultural professional across Colorado we will distribute materials and promote activities related to sustainable agriculture through the CO-WSARE web page which will require extensive updating.

  • Inputs. Financially, funding will support: 1) mini-grant program, 2) travel for extension educators to attend conferences and training 3) Program coordinator's travel to WSARE PDP meetings, and 4) provide support promoting and potentially hosting educational workshops. Additional funding will come from state and federal grants, partnering states and local The state PDP coordinators, Extension, stakeholders, and agency staff will provide human resources to participate in meetings, grants, and workshops. Facilities and equipment for events will be provided by county extension offices when possible.
  • Target audience. Extension agents and faculty (30), PDP coordinators (2), other professionals (8), as well as producers, stakeholders and NGOs.
  • Activities and methods. Participants will submit proposals for projects that provide education about and/or demonstrate sustainable agricultural practices. An Agriculture Conference is proposed to examine changes, explore approaches and methods of sustainable agriculture, the environment and food systems production, water and climate change. An evaluation will be conducted to assess audience’s knowledge gained.
  • Products. Attendees for the agents training will improve understanding of SARE principles. Agent and participant information, knowledge gained, partnerships, and behavioral change will be evaluated and shared with the SARE reporting system.

Education & Outreach Initiatives

2018 Colorado County Agents Association Professional Improvement Conference:
Objective:

This event will be an educational event where CSU campus, area agriculture producers and partners will provide professional development opportunities to the County Extension Agents of Colorado. Updates and education will occur to broaden the scope of awareness of current topics in the field of Extension in the specific areas of Sustainable Agriculture, Horticulture, Agronomy, Livestock and Range and Agriculture Business Management. Colorado County Extension Agents will be shown new ideas and topics as well as site visits of Agriculture and Horticulture business and take new ideas and decision making skills back to their county offices to better serve their communities. The educational events and tours will allow Colorado County Extension Agents to better serve their communities and take information back to the people they work with. A detailed evaluation of the event will take place where attendee’s and participants will evaluate the results of the conference to CCAA and Colorado SARE.

Description:

In September of 2018, the Colorado State University Logan County Extension staff and the Colorado County Agents Association hosted the CCAA Annual professional improvement conference in Northeast Colorado. Local and area agriculture and horticulture were highlighted where speakers and tours took place to provide professional improvement to its association members.

On Tuesday September 18th, speakers were brought in to speak on agriculture and horticulture topics. The first speaker was Mr. Mike Anderson from the Northeastern Junior College (NJC) Agriculture Department. Mr. Anderson discussed with the group about what NJC had to offer students from the state of Colorado and surrounding states. Statistics about enrollment, tuition and programs offered were discussed as well as how NJC could partner with CSU Extension in future educational programming.

Mr. Brent Young with the CSU ABM team then visited with the group about the ABM’s new Resiliency in agriculture program in Colorado, intergenerational transfer and beef marketing.

Wilma Trujillo & John Spring visited with the group about what has been happening in Agronomy and Weed management. Nitrogen fertilization of wheat and weed management were the topics of this discussion to educate agents on what these two agents have been working on as well current issues and topics in the areas of agronomy and weed management.

Brain Kailey discussed with the group about the Natural resources PIC and what those agents learned for that opportunity. Their conference as at the Colorado Springs Air Force base and Brian discussed with group about current topics and issues in the field of Natural resources.

Heidi Tribbett from Mikes Meat Market discussed with group about their beef slaughter and processing plant in Sterling Colorado. Topics of Heidi’s discussion included, USDA grading, food safety, humane animal harvest and statistics about their business. She also discussed about their Bison harvesting program and the relationship they have with Native American tribes in Oklahoma. They have a contract with these tribes to harvest and process beef specifically for the tribes and to market their products. Mikes Meat Market also provides catering in which they served a phenomenal meal to the group that evening.

On September 19th the day was full of tours highlighting local agriculture and horticulture operations. The first stop was to see an organic herbicide plot where CSU faculty and graduate students spent time highlighting different products, control methods and amounts used for success.

The second stop was at Honey Acre Farm which is a hydroponic tomato facility where they are housing and growing over 10,000 tomato plants. Sustainability was the focus on this tour as they farm had once been an irrigated row crop and cattle farm. Due to wells drying up and the loss of irrigation, they had to reinvent their selves and move a different direction to stay sustainable and productive in agriculture.

The third tour was at Graff’s Turf Farm where turf management and production was discussed with the group. A harvesting demonstration was provided and the owners also discussed about sustainability having to change in an industry that was changing on them. They once provided turf for most of the major sport fields in the country, but due increased costs and demand, they went back to focusing on the local commercial turf market and have made their selves sustainable and profitable again.

The final tour was at the Kraft Families Blind Badge/Quail Ridge dairies. The group was given the opportunity to tour a 20,000 head dairy operation and see the process in full production. Topics and tours included milking, nutrition, reproduction, health and marketing.

September 20th was the final day of the conference and we closed with speakers. The first speaker of the morning was Dr. Ryan Rhoads, CSU Beef Extension Specialists. He discussed with the group about the Beef team update and SPA. He has a goal to bring back the IRM/SPA days and to work with beef producers to make them more profitable and sustainable.

Dr Frank Gary, CSU Vet Science faculty member then discussed with the group about the Community Animal Response and emergency animal evacuation intern program in the summer of 2018 as well and did a Q & A session about the dairy industry.

Our final activity was a round table session with all the Extension Agents to find out what they had been up to over the last year as well as educational programs and opportunities they had been providing in their communities.

Outcomes and impacts:

2018 CCAA PIC evaluation summary:

  • Knowledge of work NJC is doing in agriculture:

13 responses; all indicated an increase of knowledge except one who already had “A great deal of knowledge” of the subject matter prior to the session

  • Knowledge of work at Northeast Engagement Center:

12 responses; 8 indicated an increase of knowledge by engaging with the session

  • Knowledge of CSU Agronomy work:

12 responses; 8 indicated an increase of knowledge after attending the session

  • Knowledge of organic herbicides:

12 responses; 9 indicated an increase of knowledge after attending the session

When asked if the stop increased their knowledge of organic vegetable production, 10 indicated that it did.

  1. Knowledge of hydroponic tomato production:

12 responses; 11 indicated an increase of knowledge after attending the session

When asked if this stop increased their knowledge of sustainable tomato production, all 12 indicated that it did.

  • Knowledge of turf production:

12 responses; 10 indicated an increase of knowledge after attending the session

When asked if this stop increased their knowledge of sustainable turf production, all 12 indicated that it did.

  • Knowledge of dairy production:

12 responses; 8 indicated an increase of knowledge after attending the session

When asked if this stop increased their knowledge of sustainable diary production, all 12 indicated that it did.

  • Knowledge gained about the sustainable agriculture production as a result of the tour:

12 responses; one indicated that s/he gained some knowledge while the remaining 10 indicated that they had gained a great deal of knowledge.

  • When asked how the information learned on the tour would impact the work agents do for their clients, responses included:
  1. We do have a few small organic farms in this county, and I hope to give them organic herbicide ideas for their operations.
  2. The tour gave me a good look at different Ag industries in Colorado and what it takes to build a successful enterprise. I have never had the opportunity to tour a large dairy operation and found this tour stop invaluable in my personal and professional quest for knowledge. Thanks Western SARE and oh yeah, CCAA for putting on another fantastic PIC!
  3. Knowledge gained form this professional Improvement Conference will be utilized to help producers and community members in the areas that were covered. Each tour gave a different aspect of Agriculture and will be a great tool in the future for my clients.  
  4. Will be using some of the herbicide knowledge with community gardens program
  • Increase in knowledge of work taking place with CSU’s range and beef cow Extension program:

 10 responses; 8 indicated that they had an increase in knowledge after the presentation

  • Increase in knowledge of sustainable beef cattle production:

10 responses; 8 indicated that they had an increase in knowledge after the presentation

  • Increase in knowledge of work taking place with CSU’s dairy Extension program

10 responses; 9 indicated that they had an increase in knowledge after the presentation

  • Increase in knowledge of sustainable dairy production:

10 responses; 9 indicated they had an increase in knowledge after the presentation

  • Increase in knowledge of work taking place with CSU’s range management program:

10 responses; 8 indicated that they had an increase in knowledge after the presentation

  • Increase in knowledge of sustainable range management

10 responses; 9 indicated that they had an increase in knowledge after the presentation

  • Rating the amount of knowledge gained about sustainable agriculture production as a result of attending the 2018 CCAA PIC:

13 responses; 3 indicated they had gained some knowledge, while 10 indicated that they gained a great deal of knowledge

  • How likely the respondents were to use information presented at the PIC in their work with Extension clients:

13 responses; 2 were somewhat likely, while 11 were very likely to use the information in their work

  • Rating the value respondents received from WSARE’s investment (on a scale of 1-5, 5 being the best):
    1. 1: 0
    2. 2: 0
    3. 3: 0
    4. 4: 2
    5. 5: 12
  • Rating the value respondents received from CCAA’s investment (on a scale of 1-5, 5 being the best):
    1. 1: 0
    2. 2: 0
    3. 3: 0
    4. 4: 1
    5. 5: 13

 

 

Leaving a Lasting Legacy
Objective:

A 4-hour educational program for farmers, ranchers, and their families regarding estate planning and succession planning will be conducted in Pueblo, Alamosa, and Las Animas (similar programs will also be conducted in Delta, Craig, Cortez, and Longmont). The primary objective of the programs is to help participants develop the skills and learn about resources necessary for farmers and ranchers to make informed decisions about end-of-life issues, their estates, and transitioning their farms and ranches to the next generation. The increase in understanding/awareness and skills will help Colorado’s farm and ranches be sustainable across the generations.

Description:

List partners and/or collaborators:

Jeffrey E. Tranel will be the project director. CSU Extension personal directly involved with the project include: Bruce Fickenscher (Southeast Area), Tom Laca (Pueblo County), and Marvin Reynolds (San Luis Valley Area). Other Extension personnel involved are Robin Young, Todd Hagenbuch, and Adrian Card.

Organizations that will help advertise the workshops and provide some sponsorship include: McClave State Bank, First National Bank – Las Animas, Turkey Creek Conservation District, Colorado Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association, county Farm Bureau chapters, and Rocky Mountain Farmers Union.

Project description – answer the following questions:

  1. Who is the target audience? Specifically, identify the group or groups that will be targeted for participation in your project.

The target audiences are farmers, ranchers, and their families in the San Luis Valley, Pueblo County, Southeastern Colorado, and the surrounding areas. Because of a state-wide advertising campaign, farmers/ranchers from other parts of the state may choose to participate in the workshops in the specified locations.

How will you promote the event to insure reaching this audience?

A common flyer and other promotional materials will be used to advertise the workshops in these three locations and four other locations throughout Colorado. Project partners/collaborators will distribute promotional materials via email, social media, print media, and other methods commonly used by Extension agents. Also, a copy of the promotional materials will be emailed to more than 100 agricultural lenders who will in turn distribute the materials to their clientele.

Describe briefly what you’re going to do, such as hold an educational event, produce educational materials, etc.

(1) Tranel will develop two promotional flyers and two sample print media releases for used by Extension agents; Extension agents will develop social media promotional materials; all partners/collaborators will distribute promotional materials and otherwise encourage farmers and ranchers to participate in the educational programs.

(2) Tranel will develop and assemble educational materials for presentation, experiential learning activities, and supplemental reading (including the “Leaving a Lasting Legacy” workbook). Participants will be made aware of five open access, on-line courses pertaining to estate planning and management succession.

(3) Tranel will develop an evaluation program utilizing a personal response system. Tranel has conducted more than 30 similar programs over the past four years.

(4)  Extension agents will accept participant registrations and arrange for facilities.

(5)    Tranel will deliver the educational program at three locations and evaluate the knowledge gained, etc. Adrian Card, Robin Young, and Todd Hagenbuch may assist with delivering the training.

(6)   Tranel will analyze the evaluation data and submit a project report.

What changes in awareness, knowledge or attitudes are expected to occur as a result of the target audience participating in the project? (Be specific)

Workshop participants will…

  1. …gain a greater understanding for the need to communicate with family members about end-of-life issues, passing on personal possession to future generations, estate planning, and business succession.
  2. …gain tools for improving family communications.
  3. …have a greater sense of the need to formalize estate and succession plans.
  4. …learn various strategies for turning the business over to the next generation.
  5. …become aware that without effective communications, formal estate planning, and a plan for transitioning the business to the next generation, there is a high likelihood that the farm/ranch will not be sustainable to the next generation.

 

What changes in decision-making, intentions or action do you hope will take place among the target audience? (Be specific)

Workshop participants will…

  1. …commit to having formal family communications.
  2. …commit to completing the forms found in the “Leaving a Lasting Legacy” workbook or otherwise document the information.
  3. …commit to seeking qualified professional council regarding the development of an estate plan and a plan for business succession.
  4. …commit to completing appropriate financial statements and sharing the information with their families.

 

What is the intended benefit from these changes (e.g. improved stewardship, economics, market access)?

The primary benefit of this project is that farm and ranch families will gain knowledge and skills so as to increase the probability that their farm and ranch businesses will successfully transition to the next generation. Without the changes in understanding/awareness and decision-making described above, family farms and ranches are more likely to not transition to the next generation; i.e. not be sustainable. Consequently, today’s agricultural land may not stay in production agriculture.

Evaluation plan – How will you determine if your educational outcomes have been achieved? (Describe the methods)

A personal response system will be use to pose questions to the participants and receive anonymous responses. Questions will be posed before and after topical presentations ascertain participants’ knowledge gained and intentions for applying the knowledge to their businesses and at the end of each workshop to ascertain overall knowledge gained and changes for future educational programs.

 

 

Outcomes and impacts:

 

Program Sites/Dates/Speakers:

Site

Date

Speakers

Number of Participants

Longmont

2018 Nov 13

Cancelled

0

Delta

2018 Nov 28

To be rescheduled

0

Craig

2018 Nov 29

Jeff Tranel

Todd Hagenbuch

5

Monte Vista

2018 Dec 11

Jeff Tranel

Robin Young

21

Pueblo

2019 Jan 14

Cancelled

 

Las Animas

2019 Jan 15

Cancelled

 

Cortez/Durango

2019 Feb 07

Cancelled

 

 

Comments:

  • (Craig) There was significant knowledge gained as a result of the program. On a five-point scale (with “5” being the highest, the percentage of respondents indicating a “3” dropped from 38% to 17% while the percentage of respondents indicating a “5” increased from 0% to 33%.
  • (Craig) There was great discussion. The attorney participating for the entire program was able to respond to some questions but lacks sufficient knowledge and understanding of the farm/ranch culture. One participant participated in a similar program about three year before and willingly shared her experiences in talking with her family and developing the applicable estate planning and succession planning documents.
  • (Craig) When responding to the question “what is your biggest obstacle to leaving a lasting legacy”, the highest percentage of respondents indicated “having enough time”. Historically, “bridging the family communication gap” receives the highest number of responses with “having enough time” receiving the second most responses.
  • (Monte Vista) There was significant knowledge gained as a result of the program. All but 6% of the respondents indicated their knowledge of “legacy planning” at the beginning of the educational training was 3 or less (on a 5-point scale). At the end of the program, 100% indicated they had great knowledge (a “5”).
  • (Monte Vista) No attorneys participated in the training. One hospice nurse did participate and expressed great appreciate for the program. She also said “if people would complete at least some of the Lasting Legacy workbook, they would be able to grief at the end of a family member’s life. Research shows that proper grieving leads to less depreciation, shorter recovery times, and more appropriate feelings. Having the information before one’s end of life would be a true blessing for the family.”
  • (Monte Vista) There was great discussion, sharing of personal experiences, laughter, and involvement in the training. Most people personally thanked the speakers for conducting the training and the SLV Area Director (Marvin Reynolds) for organizing the workshop. Three families asked Tranel to facilitate a family meeting, review and discuss with them their existing succession and estate plans, or meet to discuss strategies for their future succession and estate plans.

Questions & Responses:

  1. How much do you love your family? (asked at beginning of program)

Possible Response

Craig

Monte Vista

 

 

Very much

100%

80%

 

 

Most of the time

0%

13%

 

 

A little

0%

7%

 

 

Not at all

0%

0%

 

 

Have no spouse/children

0%

0%

 

 

 

  1. Rate your knowledge about legacy planning. (asked at beginning of program)

Possible Response

Craig

Monte Vista

 

 

1 (no knowledge)

0%

13%

 

 

2

0%

25%

 

 

3

38%

56%

 

 

4

63%

6%

 

 

5 (great knowledge)

0%

0%

 

 

 

  1. What is you state of mind about transferring your personal possessions? (asked after the topic section)

Possible Response

Craig

Monte Vista

 

 

It’ll be no sweat

57%

7%

 

 

It’ll be okay

43%

14%

 

 

I’m a little concerned

0%

71%

 

 

I’m dreading it

0%

0%

 

 

I don’t care

0%

6%

 

 

 

  1. Has your family had discussion about end-of-life issues? (asked before topic section)

Possible Response

Craig

Monte Vista

 

 

Yes, recently

63%

24%

 

 

Yes, long ago

25%

18%

 

 

Not really

13%

35%

 

 

No

0%

24%

 

 

 

 

  1. What is the status of your will (asked before topic section)

Possible Response

Craig

Monte Vista

 

 

No going to have one

0%

0%

 

 

Don’t have one

25%

35%

 

 

Not current, but needs changes

13%

29%

 

 

Not current, but is still in good shape

25%

24%

 

 

Current

38%

12%

 

 

 

 

 

  1. How does the “retiring generation” plan to pay for extended care? (asked before topic section)

Possible Response

Craig

Monte Vista

 

 

Insurance – extended care

13%

21%

 

 

Insurance – other

13%

7%

 

 

Cash

25%

21%

 

 

Sale of assets

0%

0%

 

 

Will have no net worth (Medicaid will pay)

38%

0%

 

 

Don’t know

13%

50%

 

 

 

 

  1. Do you have health care directives (living will)? (asked before topic section)

Possible Response

Craig

Monte Vista

 

 

Yes, and people know where to find them

43%

35%

 

 

Yes, but whereabouts unknown to others

43%

6%

 

 

No, but people know what I want

0%

12%

 

 

No

14%

47%

 

 

 

 

  1. Who do you prefer to care for you at the end of your life? (asked before topic section)

Possible Response

Craig

Monte Vista

 

 

Spouse

29%

38%

 

 

Child/Grandchildren

43%

13%

 

 

Friends

0%

0%

 

 

Professionals

29%

38%

 

 

Other

0%

13%

 

 

 

 

  1. Have you planned your end-of-life ceremony? (asked after topic section)

Possible Response

Craig

Monte Vista

 

 

Yes, and it is written

Question

Not Asked

14%

 

 

Yes, but not written

29%

 

 

No

57%

 

 

“Are you nuts?”

0%

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Who knows where to find your personal documents and can get them? (asked after topic section)

Possible Response

Craig

Monte Vista

 

 

Spouse

44%

33%

 

 

Children

11%

20%

 

 

Spouse + Children

0%

40%

 

 

Friends

0%

0%

 

 

Family + Friends

0%

0%

 

 

No One

33%

7%

 

 

 

 

  1. Has your family had discussions about succession planning? (asked during the topic section)

Possible Response

Craig

Monte Vista

 

 

Yes, recently

86%

Question

Not Asked

 

 

Yes, long ago

0%

 

 

No

14%

 

 

 

 

  1. What is your biggest obstacle to “Leaving a Lasting Legacy”? (asked at end of program)

Possible Response

Craig

Monte Vista

 

 

Don’t care

0%

0%

 

 

Bridging communication gap

0%

27%

 

 

Having enough time

50%

13%

 

 

Conflicts in family

25%

13%

 

 

Other

0%

7%

 

 

Will be starting soon

0%

40%

 

 

In good shape

25%

0%

 

 

 

 

  1. Rate your knowledge about legacy planning? (asked at end of program)

Possible Response

Craig

Monte Vista

 

 

1 (no knowledge)

0%

0%

 

 

2

0%

0%

 

 

3

17%

0%

 

 

4

50%

0%

 

 

5 (great knowledge)

33%

100%

 

 

 

 

2018 National Association of County Ag Agents AM/PIC
Objective:

Travel Scholarship to attend the conference on July 29 – August 2, 2018, Chattanooga, Tennessee. Information on conference available at: http://nacaa2018.tennessee.edu/
A) I hope to learn about how Tennessee developed and operates their Master Beef Producer program.
B) Training and reproduction management for Tennessee walking horses.
C) Intensive cattle grazing & feeding techniques.
D) Horticulture research by TSU Nursery Research Center.
E) How arts can impact a small rural town’s culture.

Description:

I will use the information learned when answering questions that clientele have.
In addition to using the information learned for answering clientele questions, our County economic development staff and I have long been discussing the merits of bringing the arts to small towns and if this has a positive effect on the health of members of the community. The tour of how arts impact a small ag community could add inspiration to this ongoing discussion and help us with a program direction.

Outcomes and impacts:

I would like to express my appreciation to the Colorado section of WSARE for financial support that help me to travel to the 2018 Professional Improvement Conference for the National Association of County Agricultural Agents. While I attended several training meetings, a couple stood out as extra pertinent to me. I had the opportunity to attend an administrative skills meeting where we learned about better ways to communicate for upcoming trainings. I was also able to attend a seminar where the presenter shared information about her research with GPS tracking of cattle. This has long been an interest of mine and the presenter provided valuable information about recent advances in the technology that may better suit my research interest in the area of study.

Additionally, I had the opportunity to do a bus tour in middle Tennessee. We visited a Tennessee Walking Horse farm where we learned about the evolution of the walking horses, their use in the horse industry, and welfare precautions that the horse industry takes for Tennessee Walking Horses. The tour then visited a cattle operation the uses intensive grazing management and off-stream water sources to improve cattle production. Our group also had the opportunity to visit a small town farmer’s market location, a local foods grocer, and local artists’ museum which were all sponsored by the local community.

SARE “Our Farms Our Future Conference”
Objective:

Travel Scholarship to attend the conference on April 3rd-5th, 2018 (arrive in St. Louise April 2nd, depart evening of April 5th) St. Louis, Missouri to gain knowledge to enhance my education.

Description:

1. Specifically, what do you hope to learn by attending this training?

I hope to learn about how SARE facilitates collaborative efforts to achieve sustainable agriculture initiatives. Collaboration among various stakeholders is an important aspect of the work I hope to do upon completing my master’s degree. I am especially interested in attending the food systems track for the breakout sessions because this will supplement my current master’s research about regional food systems and farmer’s market promotion.

2. When you return home, with whom will you share the learned information? (Who is your target audience?)

I plan primarily on sharing what I have learned with peers and professors in my department, the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics (DARE). I am thinking of presenting my experience to our the Economics of Food Systems lab group which meets once a month.

3. Do you have a specific activity in mind, such as meetings, demonstrations, work sessions with specific producers or other programming that you plan to organize in this subject area?

I do a work-share at a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farm, and I know there is opportunity there with the farm managers and the staff to host a community event regarding topics learned at SARE. This winter, the farm organized "greenhouse movie nights", where they would show a documentary related to topics like farmland stewardship and community. While the greenhouse will be in use all summer, I thought I would offer my backyard to host more film screenings and a before/after discussion in a summer BBQ "bike-in" movie setting.

4. Do you have plans to incorporate this topic or subject area into existing programming or projects? If so, please briefly describe:

Yes I do. My current master’s research is about regional food systems and farmers market promotion. I am especially excited to partake in the SARE conference breakout sessions about food systems economics which will certainly supplement my master’s education in this field. I am also a Rocky Mountain Farmers Union (RMFU) fellow this year, and I really believe that being able to attend the SARE conference will greatly allow me to better contribute to conversation in this program as well. We will be touring various farms in Colorado this summer, and visiting Washington D.C. this fall. I would love to be able to apply what I learned at SARE to this experience.

5. Do you have an estimate of how many people you might reach with knowledge you gain from receiving this scholarship? If so, please share that estimate:

A conservative estimate would be about 35 people. My department is a very tight knit community, and at the very least, through our lab group that I previously mentioned, I will get to share this information with ten students/professors. Then, through the farm community, if I were able to host at least one summer "bike-in" BBQ about a topic discussed at the SARE conference, there are 10 people who come to mind that I know would attend. Finally, my cohort for the RMFU fellows program is 14 people and there are a number of staff (about three) who work with us as well. I surely plan on discussing this experience with them as well.

Outcomes and impacts:

I am writing to express my utmost gratitude for the support WSARE provided my colleague, Abby Long and myself to attend the SARE "Our Farms Our Future" conference in April this year. Prior to graduate school, I worked on small vegetable farms around the country, and SARE often came up in my educational experiences. It has been one of my goals to attend a SARE conference, and I am very thankful to say that I was able to do so while pursuing my graduate studies in Agricultural and Resource Economics at Colorado State University.

The conference was an enriching experience for me for a number of reasons. The theme, "Envisioning the next 30 years of agriculture," was germane to my experience because the outcomes of the next 30 years of hard work in sustainable agriculture research and education will be, in large part, the responsibility of my generation of young professionals to carry forward. Another reason why this conference was such an important experience for me is that it was revitalizing to be in an atmosphere where people are talking about the research that is occurring on the ground through SARE. As many will say, graduate school is an immensely rewarding experience, but it does not come without challenges as well. One often finds themselves so engrossed in the coursework, that the bigger picture of why they were inspired to pursue graduate school to begin with can often be hard to keep in mind on a daily basis. This conference was a perfectly timed reminder of why I pursued graduate school, and why I am so passionate about being an active part of sound research, and education out West.

My goal for attending the SARE "Our Farms Our Future" conference was to learn about how SARE facilitates collaborative efforts to carry out sustainable agriculture initiatives. I was able to achieve this goal from so many of the break-out session talks as well as through following up with the speakers to inquire more about how they have made their work truly interdisciplinary. The greatest outcome from my experience at SARE was establishing connections with graduate students from other universities in different disciplines that mine, and networking with professionals that I have careers I aspire to. Two professionals in particular were an Economist in the Conservation and Environment branch at the USDA, and a Conservation Planner through the NRCS. I was able to follow up with both of them after the conference to interview them about their line of work. I have remained in touch with those who I exchanged contact

information with, which has been incredibly helpful as I start to think about the jobs I will be applying to next year.

Other ways I have applied what I have learned at SARE are primarily through my extra-curricular involvement as a member of Rocky Mountain Farmers Union (RMFU). At SARE I realized the importance of establishing community networks to tackle local sustainable agricultural problems, as well as the importance of educating people about the value of peer-reviewed, publicly available science. I have since represented Larimer County as an RMFU delegate at our annual convention in November. I am proud to say that our chapter established policy within the organization that supports local and regional food systems and peer-reviewed, publicly available science to inform national and state policy. Lastly, our chapter did continue to host one more "green-house movie night" which also played the film shown at SARE, "Living Soil".

The support provided for me to attend the SARE "Our Farms Our Futures" conference has helped me grow as a young professional in a variety of ways and is much appreciated. I will always remember attending my first SARE conference when I was a graduate student, and look forward to my continued involvement in SARE. I wish you the best, and please do not hesitate to reach out to me or our department for support you may also need. Collaboration is key!

 

SARE “Our Farms Our Future Conference”
Objective:

Travel Scholarship to attend the conference on April 3rd-5th, 2018 (arrive in St. Louise April 2nd, depart evening of April 5th) St. Louis, Missouri to gain knowledge to enhance my education.

Description:

1. Specifically, what do you hope to learn by attending this training?

I am particularly interested in the “Developing Partnerships for a Local Food Economy” and “Launching

the Next Generation of Farmers and Ranchers” conference tracks. My research is currently focused on

Farm to School procurement, thus it is important for me to keep abreast of the work practitioners are

doing in building partnerships focused on increasing production and consumption of local foods.

Additionally I am broadly interested in how public policy effects mid size farmers and ranchers,

especially those considered “younger” or beginning. As such I hope to learn about where the

conversation is regarding support for new farmers/ranchers.

2. When you return home, with whom will you share the learned information? (Who is your target

audience?)

My target audience for this information is my fellow researchers, both faculty and other graduate

students. I believe it is of the utmost importance that researches understand what is happening on the

ground in order to better motivate their research efforts based on what is needed. Thus I hope to bring as

much information as possible back into the university setting.

3. Do you have a specific activity in mind, such as meetings, demonstrations, work sessions with specific

producers or other programming that you plan to organize in this subject area?

We have a Food Systems lab within our Agricultural Economics department. I would like to share what I

learn at one of our monthly meetings.

4. Do you have plans to incorporate this topic or subject area into existing programming or projects? If so,

please briefly describe:

I imagine what I learn at this conference will be implicitly incorporated into my research project design

and motivation. It will inform the work I do as well as the resulting publications.

5. Do you have an estimate of how many people you might reach with knowledge you gain from receiving

this scholarship? If so, please share that estimate:

I am unsure of how many people this knowledge will reach. It will be at least 10-15 within my

department. Beyond that some information will be transmitted implicitly through at least two

publications in the next year or so.

Outcomes and impacts:

Attending the SARE Our Farms Our Future conference was an invaluable experience. It allowed me to connect with practitioners. add nuance to my work as a researcher and generally update my sense of what is most important to producers currently.

Since the conference my work has, independently, shifted to focus specifically on Farm to School policy and I regularly find myself referring to conversations I encountered at SARE. In particular, there was a special session focused on Farm Bill policy which provided me with the most comprehensive perspective on the bill I have ever obtained. In hindsight that session was the starting point for what has become the underlying motivation to my (policy-centric) thesis. As such the conference has informed multiple presentations I have given since. In one case it helped me contextual Farm to School data collection I presented on in our departmental Food Systems Lab. It has also helped me to better support and articulate my motivations in preliminary thesis presentations.

Overall the SARE Our Farms Our Future conference was an experience that helped keep my work in academia rooted in what is important to practitioners. I appreciate the opportunity WSARE provided in helping me attend such an informative and inspiring event.

 

 

 

Drought Resilient Ranching: Learn from this drought | Prepare for the next
Objective:

This 3-part workshop focuses on ranching with drought in western Colorado. Workshop attendees will hear from fellow rancher Wink Crigler on ranching with drought in Arizona, plan for potential 2019 irrigation, wildfire, market and rangeland drought scenarios, prioritize actions to increase the resilience of their operations, and open communication channels with local representatives from the US Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management.
List partners and/or collaborators:
Hailey Wilmer, USDA Climate Hub
Lydia LaBelle de Rios, USFS, Rifle, CO
Abi Saeed, CSU Extension, Garfield County, CO
Sami Dinar, USFS, Carbondale, CO
Jana Farris, Rancher in Rifle area

Description:

This workshop series is geared towards ranchers in and near Rifle, CO, whose operations involve public land grazing allotments, irrigation, and rangeland grazing. I aim to create a balance of older and newer producers.
b. How will you promote the event to insure reaching this audience?
I am working with local partners, including a local rancher, the local USFS contact, and the Conservation District. Additionally, I will send information on the workshop out via my contacts at Colorado Cattleman’s Association, and through my personal list of contacts. Rifle is centrally located, and we may be able to attract ranchers from Garfield, Rio Blanco, Eagle and Mesa Counties.
This event will be three 2-hour workshops on Wednesday evenings in January, 2019. Below follows a rough outline of each class within the series:
Jan. 16: Arizona rancher Wink Crigler shares lessons from a drier state on adapting to aridity, experience with wildfire, and working with agencies to accomplish goals and increase flexibility in her operation to cope with drought. Discussion to follow.
Jan. 23: Use Scenario Planning, a technique used in business and the US Military to make flexible, long-term plans relative to potential drought scenarios. Experts in water management, wildfire management, ag. economics and more will be in attendance for questions and to guide the scenarios.
Jan. 30. Prioritize actions to increase drought resilience & connect with resources to implement projects. Experts and staff from Colorado Parks and Wildlife, the NRCS, US Forest Service and more will be present to discuss options and to answer questions.

Drought Resilient Ranch v4 WSARE Eval info retta 2019

Outcomes and impacts:

Attendees will:
1. Learn from other examples of ongoing drought resilience activities in other states, specifically Arizona.
2. Learn from neighbors who are also coping with increasing aridity and business impacts.
3. Describe 2 possible scenarios for drought in their area and then investigate how those drought scenarios might impact their ranch
4. Learn from examples of working effectively with public agencies to increase flexibility in drought.
Attendees will be able to:
1. Identify 1-3 actions they can take to make their operations more adaptable with drought, and
2. Identify resources that can help them accomplish these goals.
The benefits of these changes will be improved economic and ecological resilience with regards to drought, and improved communication and coordination among producers and local US Forest Service and BLM personnel in the region.
Summary of Evaluation Results:
• When asked, “Rate the usefulness of this workshop for you. I.e., what is the likelihood it will affect how you do your work? (1-5, with 1 being lowest and 5 being highest)” on post-evaluations, 88% of respondents rated the workshop as a 4 or 5.
• When asked, “Did the workshop hold your interest (1 = low to 5 = high),” 88% of respondents rated the workshop as 4 or 5.
• Other evaluation criteria in the chart below. A majority of respondents rated themselves higher in terms of drought preparation following the workshop.
Loma, CO: About 30 people, including mostly ranchers, and a few non-profit representatives.
Rifle, CO: about 17 people attended the three part series. Attendees were mostly ranchers with local USFS and Extension staff.

WSARE Eval info retta 2019

2019 Colorado Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association conference
Objective:

CFVGA provides educational outreach to growers and ag professionals through an annual conference in Denver. Ag professionals will learn the latest related to food safety, worker health, risk management, farm succession, business development and ag tech aspects of fruit and vegetable production. Now at two days, the February 25-26, 2019 conference is anticipated to attract more than 300 growers, ag professionals, produce buyers and input suppliers to Denver. New in 2019, we will host Deep Dive sessions that allow participants to explore further topics of interest and complexity. One Deep Dive will feature Specialty Crops Block Grant recipient reports, allowing participants to learn from the outcomes of this grant program. See more at https://cfvga.org
List partners and/or collaborators:
CSU Extension, CSU Ag Experiment Station, CSU College of Ag Sciences, Rockies Venture Club, PSL Law, FFA, Colorado Dept of Ag, Western Growers Association, LiveWell Colorado, Rocky Mountain Farmers Union, Food Bank of the Rockies, Boulder County Farmers Markets, Rocky Ford Growers Association, Colorado Onion Growers, Colorado Potato Admin Committee.

Description:

• Commercial fruit and vegetable growers are the primary audience
Ag professionals are the secondary audience
• We will offer a two day educational conference with networking and breakout sessions.
         1. Ag producers and professionals will increase knowledge regarding the challenges and opportunities                facing the fruit and vegetable industry in Colorado.
         2. Ag producers and professionals will show intention to implement or create programs for growers to                implement best practices for food safety, labor, production and business development
         3. Ag producers will increase farm resiliency and realize business goals through improved access to                    appropriate resources and best practices.
         4. Paper evaluation at the conference to all attendees.

Building Drought Resilient Ranchlands Workshops
Objective:

We will be presenting Building Drought Resilient Ranchlands Workshops to ranchers in Southeast Colorado.
List partners and/or collaborators:
• Local CSU Extension offices building off of last year’s drought workshops
• Specific ranchers
• NRCS

Description:

Target audience:
• Ranchers and professional land managers
Promotion through:
• Electronic communications based on local Extension Office contact lists
• Colorado Cattleman’s Association and land trusts in Southern Colorado newsletters
• Colorado State extension Range, Small acreage, and ABM websites
• Radio
• Flyers posted at local farm and ranch supply stores, etc.
We will be presenting Building Drought Resilient Ranchlands Workshops to ranchers in Southeast Colorado. We will be teaching participants about:
1. Present economic potential of productive rangelands specific to the most common Ecological Sites of southern Colorado.
2. Forage quality and drought (Present ARS data on forage quality during drought and post drought) including Colorado Climate Hub climate predictions
3. Techniques for keeping water on the landscape
a. Contour and key-line plowing
b. Simple low cost water structures designed for reducing surface and channelized flow in large precipitation events
c. Seeding techniques and species for improving range production
4. Livestock management (supplements, genetics, etc.)
What changes in awareness, knowledge or attitudes are expected to occur as a result of the target audience participating in the project?
• Ranchers and practitioners will build drought resilience into their operations
• Ranchers will learn how to quantify forage production and forage potential for their ranch
• Ranchers will increase their toolbox of options for taking advantage of any precipitation event
What changes in decision-making, intentions or action do you hope will take place among the target audience?
• Ranchers will begin implementing grazing practices that allow recovery
• Ranchers will spend some of the off-season experimenting and implementing water saving techniques that they can share with neighbors
• Ranchers will create a plan (stockpiling, define specific thresholds for de-stocking, improving water and fencing)
• Ranch owners and managers will reach out to Extension for help with drought planning.

Outcomes and impacts:

We conducted Building Drought Resilient Ranchlands roundtable style workshops to ranchers in Eastern Colorado.
We collaborated with:
• Jeff Tranel of CSU extension
• Specific ranchers
• NRCS
• ARS High Plains Research scientists
• Pawnee Buttes Seed Company
We presented and discussed the following:
1 Present economic potential of productive rangelands specific to the most common Ecological Sites of southern Colorado and how to restore potential production through grazing management.
2 Forage quality and drought (Present ARS data on forage quality during drought and post drought) including Colorado Climate Hub climate predictions
3 Techniques for keeping water on the landscape
a. Simple low-cost water structures designed for reducing surface and channelized flow in large precipitation events
b. Seeding techniques and species for improving range production
4 We discussed research requests by ranchers.
5 We discussed potential improvements to CRP, CSP, and EQIP
6 We discussed current soil health practices for water savings and potential needs for research regarding seeding rangelands and compost application
Changes in awareness, knowledge or
Most roundtable events were organized into small pod discussions. This format allowed ranchers to feel comfortable discussing drought plans
• Six ranchers volunteered their drought case study to be shared with other ranchers
• Ranchers learned the most recent efforts in soil health on the plains, including drought tolerant seed varieties, soil health legislation in CO, and compost application
We had 78-85 participants

WSARE Summer Meeting: Guam and Ponhepi
Objective:

To understand the agriculture practices in the islands.
To connect with the Universities and Extension in the islands.
To develop an understanding of the existing culture and the past history.
To provide educational programs on swine selection and management.
To provide education on greenhouse structure and functionality in the islands.
To provide grant writing techniques to Extension personnel.

Description:

Guam:
Monday, May 13
• State reports meeting at 5 p.m.
Tuesday Tour:
• Bus leaves the Hilton Resort at 7:30 am.
• Tour stops will feature both larger and smaller farms, but large farms on Guam are only 20 acres.
• Tour might end with chefs’ collaborative meal and interaction between farmers and chefs.
Wednesday:
• WSARE Professional Development Program Business meeting 8:00 am to 3:00 pm.Thursday:
• Craig Elevitch training will take place on Thursday, May 16th. It will focus on agroforestry and will feature many of the great items Craig has written about in his many books. There is not fee to attend this and everyone is welcome.
Friday:
• Al Kurki, Kim Kroll and Kent Wasson – grant writing sessions on Guam in the morning.
• After Friday, we will proceed to our destinations.
Pohnpei Team (Coordinator, Jackson Phillips)
• Jackson Phillips, Pohnpei COM CRE Director jphillip1127@gmail.com
• Avelon Edward, Pohnpei COM CRE Director’s Assistant aedward.cre@gmail.com
• Mark Kostka, COM-FSM Campus Instructor mkostka@comfsm.fm
• Kiyoshi Phillip, COM-FSM Campus Chair of Ag kphillip@comfsm.fm
• Charles Aiseam, COM-FSM Campus Instructor caiseam@comfsm.fm
• Francisco Mendiola, COM-FSM Campus Staff mendiolaf@comfsm.fm
• Gyrone Samuel, Pohnpei COM CRE Ag Agent gyrosamu@comfsm.fm
• Bryan Wichep, Pohnpei COM CRE Ag Agent bryawich@comfsm.fm
• Tobias Tamerlan, Pohnpei COM CRE Ag Agent tobias@comfsm.fm
• Virendra Mohan Verma, Kosrae COM-FSM Researcher verma@comfsm.fm
• Singeru Singeo, COM-Land Grant Director ssingeo@mail.fm
• Manoj Nair, COM-Land Grant Aquaculture manojnair999@yahoo.com
W-SARE Team (Co-coordinators, Fabian Menalled and Ashley Stokes)
• Fabian Menalled, Montana State University menalled@montana.edu
• Ashley Stokes, Colorado State University ashley.stokes@colostate.edu
• Stacie Clary, Communications for W-SARE wsareoutreach@gmail.com
• Bill Nobles, Colorado State University william.nobles@colostate.edu
• Steve Newman, Colorado State University steven.newman@colostate.edu
• Julie Maitland, New Mexico Dept. of Agriculture jmaitland@nmda.nmsu.edu
• Steve Foster, University of Nevada Reno fosters@unce.unr.edu
Schedule
• Friday, May 17: Travel to Pohnpei (arrival at PNI 1:03pm)
o Pick –up Rental Cars
o Check-in Hotels
o Possible Visit to Saimon’s Market
o Dinner on Own (List of recommended restaurants will be provided)
• Saturday, May 18:
o 8:30-9:30 Introductions and W-SARE Panel Discussion (CRE Office)
 Jackson to lead intros, ice-breaker, Fabian to lead overview of W-SARE
o 9:45-11:45 Meet with local offices of NRCS, Dept of Ag (Edward Rollin/Katolino Lorens), and the Pohnpei Farmer’s Association (CRE Office)
o 12:00-1:00 Lunch and Online Programs Discussion (CRE Office; paid by W-SARE)
o 1:15-5:00 Farm Tours (group will divide up, feel free to join group you wish – these are only suggestions for now)
 Adams Cattle Herd (Ashley Stokes, Bill Noble, Gyrone Samuel)
 Caroline Issac Vegetable Crops (Fabian Menalled, Tobias Tamerlan, Stacie Clary)
 Rensper Johnny Vegetable Crops (Julie Maitland, Steve Newman, Bryan Wichep)
 College Aquaculture Facility (Ashley Stokes, Others interested?, Stacie Clary, Manoj Nair)
o 6:00 Meet-up as a Group to Recap Day and Dinner Together (Location TBD)
• Sunday, May 19: Day Off – Cultural Experience: Visits to Nan Madol (by car), Simon Ellis farm, Short Hike to WWII Gun (Mark Kostka to Help Arrange?) Bring shoes that you can wade around a little when you visit Nan Madol. Will provide lunch to Simon and 6 others plus our team. microellis@gmail.com, jemendiola28@gmail.com
• Monday, May 20:
o 8:00-10:30 College of Micronesia-FSM National Campus (everyone)
 President of the COM-FSM (Joseph Daisy; BOR Conference Room)
 College Facilities: Pepper, Pineapple, Piggery, Compost/Gardening (Mark Kostka, Kiyoshi Phillip, Virendra Verma, Charles Aiseam)
o 11:00-12:00 College of Micronesia Land-Grant Pohnpei Campus (everyone)
 Director (Singeru Singeo and maybe Engly Ioanis; CRE Office)
o 12:00-1:00 Lunch (CRE Office) (paid by W-SARE)
o 1:15-5:00 Workshops (CRE Office or Classroom or Island Food Community Office)
 1hr Animal Health (Ashley Stokes, Bill Nobles)
 1hr Swine AI, Reproduction (Steve Foster, Bill Nobles)
 1hr Greenhouse Design, Watering Systems (Steve Newman)
 1hr Hydroponics (Steve Newman, Charles Aiseam)
• Tuesday, May 21
o 8:00-9:00 U.S. Embassy Visit (everyone) (Jackson has contacted)
o 9:30-11:00 Governor of Pohnpei and/or Speaker of Pohnpei State Legislature at Government Building (everyone) (Jackson has contacted)
o 11:30-1:00 Grant Writing Discussion, Panel, and Lunch (CRE Office, Fabian Menalled, Julie Maitland, Stacie Clary (grant writing templates))
o 1:15-3:15 Swine AI Hands-On (CRE Office?, equipment, techniques, animal handling; Steve Foster & Ashley Stokes)
o 3:15-4:15 Grant Planning for Swine AI Facility and Breeding Stock (CRE Office, Jackson, Phillips, Steve Foster & Ashley Stokes)
o 4:15-5:00 Wrap-up Session and Next Steps
o (Teachers and Youth Development Leaders (15-year-olds at least); Workshop 4:00-6:00; Irene Grimberg, W-SARE)
• Wednesday, May 22: Leave from Pohnpei

Outcomes and impacts:

Both program events in Guam and Pohnpei where well received by Extension personnel, locals, and administration.
1. An increased understanding of grant writing techniques was accomplished.
2. Locals and Extension learned about swine management from breeding, disease prevention, swine selection, facilities and overall animal health.
3. Professionals and locals learned about greenhouse design, and watering systems and the use of hydroponics.

Agriculture Innovation Summit
Objective:

The fourth CSU Ag Innovation Summit on December 5 & 6, 2019 explored the inner workings of innovation, ranging from the creation of innovative processes, cultures and teams to the importance of thinking differently in designing sustainable solutions to agriculture’s grand challenges.

Description:

Environmental Protection Agency for an agriculture and food production Smart Sectors roundtable discussion prior to the start of the Summit program on Thursday afternoon.
Who:
· Agriculture stakeholders
· Producers
· Associations
· Environmental NGO’s
· Local, State and Federal government employees
What: EPA Smart Sectors is a partnership program that provides a platform to collaborate with regulated sectors and develop sensible approaches that better protect the environment and public health: https://www.epa.gov/smartsectors
Why:
The roundtable is focused on the following:
· Identifying practical solutions to various environmental regulatory, permitting, and compliance challenges to achieve more effective and efficient environmental outcomes.
· To improve relationships and enhance communications among agriculture and food production stakeholders.
· To identify and share solutions related to challenges that adversely impact efficient and timely compliance.
How:
· Stakeholders will come together to share their individual expertise and experience. Participants will be asked to share their individual viewpoints throughout the roundtable and consensus will not be sought.
Questions to ponder before attending the roundtable:
· In your personal opinion which EPA policies or regulations would you like to see modified or made easier with which to comply?
· In your personal opinion what could the EPA do to accomplish this?
Panel Discussion – Telling Our Story
Storytelling is one of the most important traditions we possess and has arguably never been more important for bridging the trust gap between consumers and modern agriculture. This discussion will feature inspiring examples and strategies that use the art of storytelling to connect, educate and create change.
Krysta Harden, Executive Vice President of Global Environmental Strategy, Dairy Management Inc.
Polly Ruhland, Chief Executive Officer, United Soybean Board
Daphne Taber, Customer Experience Practice Area Lead, Slalom Consulting
Moderator – Kate Greenberg, Colorado Commissioner of Agriculture
The Call for Innovation
Saswati Bora, Head of Food Systems Innovation, World Economic Forum
A review of the global forces – macroeconomic, environmental, political, social, technological, financial – that are demanding a relentless focus on innovation in agriculture.
Answering the Call for Innovation
Dr. Robb Fraley, Former Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Monsanto Company
Dr. Fraley will share his perspective on the importance of agricultural innovation to the industry’s past, present and future, and look forward to the disruptive thinking and technologies that are responding to the global grand challenges we face.
Panel Discussion – Come to the Table
Agriculture is at the cusp of a new and exciting era when fundamental relationships are being reimagined – cultivating diverse perspectives and partners can help foster the ideas and energy to meet our grand challenges. How do we manage and leverage diversity in all its forms as a catalyst for game-changing innovation while remaining agile and profitable?
Erin Fitzgerald, Chief Executive Officer, U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance
Philomena Morrissey Satre, Director of Diversity and Inclusion and Strategic Partnerships, Land O’Lakes, Inc.
Dr. Quentin Tyler, Associate Dean and Director for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Michigan State University; Advisory Board Chair, MANRRS
Moderator – Kristin Kirkpatrick, Executive Director, Together We Grow and Center for an Enhanced Workforce in Agribusiness at CSU.
Leadership Discussion – Building an Innovation Mindset
Why are some organizations routinely successful at innovating while most others struggle? This discussion seeks to “crack the code” of innovation, exploring unique leadership approaches to designing culture, teams and processes to foster discovery and disruption across a diverse spectrum of agribusiness.
Jodi Benson, Chief Innovation, Technology and Quality Officer, General Mills
Florian Schattenmann, Chief Technology Officer, Vice President – Innovation, Research and Development, Cargill
Moderator – Angela Ichwan, Senior Director Technical Lead, The Annex by Ardent Mills
Panel Discussion – Innovation for a Resilient World
Our climate is shifting, inspiring innovative approaches for resilient food and ecological systems for the betterment of people, animals, plants and society. The discussion will showcase innovators from across the agricultural value chain who share a commitment to the triple bottom line of people, planet and profit while feeding the growing global population.
Sarah Bohnenkamp, Sustainability and Leadership Communication Consultant/Coach
Candace Laing, Vice President, Sustainability and Stakeholder Relations, Nutrien
Martha Montoya, Founder and CEO, Ag Tools
Moderator – Jasmine A. Dillon, Assistant Professor of Beef & Dairy Agroecosystems, College of Agricultural Sciences, CSU

Outcomes and impacts:

The summit convened approximately 200 people on CSU’s Fort Collins campus, contributing diverse perspectives from agricultural producers, agribusiness, entrepreneurs, investors, key government leaders and scientists to provoke thought and catalyze momentum for advancing regional and global agriculture. The event featured an engaging plenary session spanning both days and ample networking opportunities, including an exclusive VIP dinner for university leadership, event sponsors and speakers, including former Secretary Tom Vilsack, Erin Fitzgerald of U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance, and Krysta Harden of Dairy Management Inc.
Funding was used to provide streaming and recording for increased delivery across the state and western US, live and recorded, for access by CSU Extension staff in the counties. Videos of all Summit sessions can be found here: http://csuaginnovationsummit.colostate.edu/video-archives/.
Sponsorship benefits provided to SARE:
• Brand/logo recognition on digital and physical promotional materials
• Verbal recognition and digital signage at event

Educational & Outreach Activities

65 Consultations
4 Minigrants
2 On-farm demonstrations
1 Study circle/focus groups
15 Tours
3 Travel Scholarships
7 Webinars / talks / presentations
12 Workshop field days

Participation Summary:

65 Extension
47 NRCS
75 Researchers
46 Nonprofit
34 Agency
346 Farmers/ranchers

Learning Outcomes

324 Participants gained or increased knowledge, skills and/or attitudes about sustainable agriculture topics, practices, strategies, approaches
76 Ag professionals intend to use knowledge, attitudes, skills and/or awareness learned

Project Outcomes

3 Grants received that built upon this project
11 New working collaborations
38 Agricultural service provider participants who used knowledge and skills learned through this project (or incorporated project materials) in their educational activities, services, information products and/or tools for farmers

Face of SARE

Face of SARE:

Outreach:

When we look at the summary of our statewide outreach efforts in sustaining agriculture, it is important to note that WSARE is a significant portion of these ongoing efforts. The philosophical change of Extension being driven from the local level has generated more need for Extension Agent education in a broader sense. The locally driven model focuses more on needs approach of programming and has merit particularly when local stakeholder input is asking for a broader variety of agriculture based issues. In the future, it could be that our Colorado State University Extension will more closely align with Experiment Station, the College of Agricultural Sciences, and the Colorado State Forest Service.

With 2 PDP Coordinators we have been diligent to provide SARE information to both Colorado State University and through Extension offices with the use of emails and marketing of SARE through agricultural events.

Involvement of other stakeholders in your state’s PDP planning and implementation:

The primary advisory group we use is the members for the Small Farms/ Small Acreages, Food Systems and Livestock /Range Extension Work Teams. In addition, we have involved an NRCS and Colorado County Agents Association to review plans and provide input. Many of the committee members gather at the events held to talk about future needs functioning as an advisory board. Generally, we utilize email and ZOOM more than anything else to communicate.

45 Farmers received information about SARE grant programs and information resources
126 Ag professionals received information about SARE grant programs and information resources
Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture or SARE.